Chapter4SlaveryFreedomandtheStruggleforEmpireto1763

Chapter4SlaveryFreedomandtheStruggleforEmpireto1763 -...

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Chapter 4: Slavery, Freedom, and the Struggle for Empire to 1763 1. How did Great Britain’s position in North America change relative to the other European powers during the first three­quarters of the eighteenth century? This was a period of sustained development for British in North America. The colonies were growing much more rapidly. Some spoke of British America as a “rising empire.” The first three­ quarters of the eighteenth century simply as prelude to American Independence. The Atlantic was more a bridge that a barrier between the Old and New Worlds. Ideas, people, and goods flowed back and forth across the ocean. Even as the colonies’ populations became more diverse, they were increasingly integrated into the British empire. Their laws and political institutions were extensions of those of Britain, their ideas about society and culture reflected British values, their economies were geared to serving the empire’s needs. As European powers jockeyed for advantage in North America, colonists were drawn into an almost continuous series of wars with France and its Indian allies, which reinforced their sense of identification with and dependence on Great Britain. Era when the idea of the “freeborn Englishman” became powerfully entrenched in the outlook of both colonists and Britons. Liberty was seen as what made the British empire distinct. 2. How did the ideas of republicanism and liberalism differ in eighteenth­century British North America? The idea of republicanism celebrated active participation in public life by economically independent citizens and held virtue­meaning a willingness to subordinate self­interest to the public good­to be crucial in public life. It meant a government without a king. Republicanism in Britain was associated with the Country Party, which criticized Britain’s loss of virtue. Liberalism was strongly influenced by Philosopher John Locke and his ideas included individual rights, the concern of the governed and the right of the rebellion against the unjust or oppressive government. It meant celebrating freedom, it was essentially individual and private.
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