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Lecture 16 - Unit 10 Creating the Constitution Lecture...

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Unit 10: Creating the Constitution Lecture Outline 1. New State Constitutions, 1776-1781 2. The Congress of the Confederation, 1781-1786 3. Creating the Constitution, 1787 4. Ratification and the Bill of Rights, 1787-91 5. President Washington and the Constitution Copies of this Powerpoint file will be available for download from the course website after class
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Creating the Constitution 1. New State Constitutions, 1776-1781
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Mass protests and wartime mobilization had given ordinary Americans a greater taste for political participation. They expected to be represented and listened to by the new state governments created between 1776 and 1781
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Left: a draft of the new state constitution of Pennsylvania New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Georgia each lowered the property threshold for voting North Carolina, South Carolina, New Hampshire and Pennsylvania let any one who paid taxes vote in state elections Vermont allowed all adult males the right to vote, even if they were too poor to pay taxes. Most new state constitutions allowed more people to vote in state elections than before the war
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Left: a draft of the new state constitution of Pennsylvania Abolished the position of governor All power in the hands of an elected assembly - elected by anyone who paid taxes So radical that elites like John Dickinson tried to eliminate many of its radical clauses (left: his crossings out on his personal copy) The radicalism of the new Pennsylvania Constitution
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The New States Face an Economic Crisis, 1770s-1780s The British Army had left many Carolinians penniless or homeless Many slaves had deserted southern plantations, leaving
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