Lecture 9 - Unit 5 Northern Slavery Lecture Outline 1 2 3 4...

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Unit 5: Northern Slavery Lecture Outline 1. The Scale of Northern Slavery 2. Slave Codes in Colonial New York 3. 1741 Slave Plot: Events 4. 1741 Slave Plot: Prosecutions Copies of this Powerpoint file will be available for download from the course website after class
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Northern Slavery 1. The Scale of Northern Slavery
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Newport, Rhode Island had the largest slave population, and one of the busiest ports in British North America
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• 1760: 20% of population were enslaved • 1709-1807: Rhode Island merchants sponsored at least 934 slaving voyages to the coast of Africa • Their ships carried an estimated 106,544 Africans to the New World Newport, Rhode Island, and Slavery
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Negro Election Day in New York • An annual festival and feast • Culminates in slave elections • Winners lead parades on horseback, and will serve as arbitrators of disputes between slaves for the year to come
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The African- American Cemetery in Newport, Rhode Island In northern seaports, the black residents, most of whom were slaves, died at twice the rate of whites working in the same cities.
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Northern Slavery 2. Slave Codes in Colonial New York
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New York’s economy was based on shipping foodstuff to the English slave colonies in the Caribbean. In return they sent slaves to work in families and on the docks of the growing city. 1740s: Slaves accounted for 20% of the city’s population Image: New York City harbor, c. 1740
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New York City Slave Codes 1702 • granted masters total authority in disciplining their own slaves, provided they didn’t permanently wound or kill their slaves without a good reason • forbid slaves from meeting in groups larger than two without the masters’ consent or presence.
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course PHIL 100 taught by Professor ? during the Spring '07 term at Maryland.

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Lecture 9 - Unit 5 Northern Slavery Lecture Outline 1 2 3 4...

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