maira(1) - INTRODUCTION Electricity Sector In Pakistan...

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INTRODUCTION Electricity Sector In Pakistan Pakistan has been facing electricity crisis right from its inception to present day.Pakistan had capacity to produce only 60 MW for its 31.5 million people and rest was to beimported from India. Pakistan, recently, is producing around 12000 MW with the shortfall of 4000 MW. This crisis has led to formidable economic challenges. Load shedding and power blackouts have adversely affected economic growth. The figure 1 depicts a strong positive relation between the GDP growth rate and the growth rate of electricity generation. Trend analysis shows that average GDP growth rate remains low during the period of low growth rate of electricity generation. The GDP growth has declined from 5.8 percent in 2006 to 3.6 percent in 2013 when growth rate of electricity generation has declined from 11.8 percent to 1.5 percent during the same period. It is estimated that load shedding and power blackouts have caused a loss of around 2 percent of GDP (Abbasi, 2007). Industrial production and exports have been severely affected by power crisis in Pakistan. The growth rate of industrial sector has declined from 7.7 percent in 2007 to 2.7 percent in 2012. A study has shown that industrial output has declined in the range of 12 to 37 percent due to power shortages (Siddiqui et al. 2011). The export growth has declined from 4.6 percent to -2.8 percent during same period. The Relation between GDP Growth and Electricity Generation Growth
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There are four major power producers in country: WAPDA (Water & Power Development Authority), KESC (Karachi Electric Supply Company), IPPs (Independent Power Producers) and PAEC (Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission). The break-up of the installed capacity of each of these power producers (as of Jan-2012) is as follows: A. WAPDA Hydel Tarbela 3478 MW Mangla 1000 MW Ghazi – Barotha 1450 MW Warsak 243 MW Chashma 184 MW Dargai 20 MW Rasul 22 MW Shadi-Waal 13.5 MW Nandi pur 14 MW KurramGarhi 4 MW Renala 1 MW Chitral 1 MW Jagran (AK) 30 MW Khankhwar 72 MW AllaiKhwar 121 MW GomalZam Dam 17 MW Jabban 22 MW DuberKhwar Dam 130 MW Total Hydel 6,823 MW B. WAPDA Thermal Gas Turbine Power Station, Shahdra 59 MW Steam Power Station, Faisalabad 132 MW Gas Turbine Power Station, Faisalabad 244 MW Gas Power Station, Multan 195 MW
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