BASC_201_-_Lecture_20_(Mar_25_-_Prof._Chapman)_-_UNEDITED

BASC_201_-_Lecture_20_(Mar_25_-_Prof._Chapman)_-_UNEDITED -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Tuesday, March 25, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 20) Prof. Chapman 8 MARCH 25, 2008 – Prof. Chapman 20
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tuesday, March 25, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 20) Prof. Chapman *Note : THIS IS AN UNEDITED VERSION OF THE NTC. The NTC is currently under review by the editor, and so the edited version will be posted shortly . Collin Chapman is a primatologist who currently does conservation work in Kibale National Park in Uganda. The objective of the next two lectures is to show why a multidisciplinary approach is needed to answer some critical conservation questions. The Threats that primates face are the threats that most tropical animals face. 1. Deforestation - (Chapman pointed out that the statistics are merely details) tropical countries are losing 12.5 million hectares of forest annually, which would support 32 million primates. (14 million hectares is about the size of Florida… or half of Quebec… a lot basically). - Here are some countries and their deforestation rates. Two estimations are being observed (one done by FAO (food and agriculture organization) and the other by satellite images) - Costa Rica has a great national park system. Good conservation, but anything outside of those is devastated. Deforestation can be defined as cutting down trees and leaving only 10% of the original number of trees still standing. This does not include selectively logged areas. - A lot of the deforestation is done by industries that sell them nationally, but also is done by locals as in Congo, for example for domestic use. Here it is estimated that 5 to 6 million hectares of tropical forest is logged each year (about the size of Ireland). The biggest logging party in Congo is the Zimbabwe army. - A problem with these estimations is it is hard to included areas that are burned (if you burned an area once, it will grow back, but if you burn it a few times, it won’t.) - If you include the 3 million hectares burned each year, then the amount of forest either deforested, logged or burned is 21 million hectares.What you’re basically to understand from all these numbers is that deforestation is being done an awful lot. - By 2020 the forests of the Amazon and Congo basins will have been reduced by 50% and 25% respectively. All closed canopy tropical forest will be cleared within 150 years, given present rates. (and current Congo rates are even higher than the global average).
Background image of page 2
Tuesday, March 25, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 20) Prof. Chapman 2. Hunting - The hunting is mainly being done for subsistence (food for the family) or commercial purposes (the meat is sold nationally and internally as bush meat. You can be buy bushmeat in New York and Amsterdam). -
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

BASC_201_-_Lecture_20_(Mar_25_-_Prof._Chapman)_-_UNEDITED -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online