BASC_201_-_Lecture_22_(Apr_1_-_Dr._Borod)

BASC_201_-_Lecture_22_(Apr_1_-_Dr._Borod) - 22 8 Tuesday...

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Tuesday, April 1, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 22) Dr. Borod 8 APRIL 1, 2008 – Dr. Borod 22
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Tuesday, April 1, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 22) Dr. Borod Ethics in Palliative Care Announcements There may be an upcoming TA strike next Monday or Tuesday where there will be picket lines preventing students from going to class. Because of this interference next week’s lectures will still take place but will not be on the final. Prof’s take home message: if you want to see a quick resolution, get involved in your education and apply pressure to the administration or the TAs’ union depending on your stance. Introducing Palliative Care Palliative care is defined by the WHO as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment. Thus, the emphasis is not on death but on contained and controlled chronic problems. It also involves the control of pain, of other symptoms and of psychological, social, and spiritual problems. The goal of palliative care is the achievement of the best possible quality of life for patients and their families. Many aspects of palliative care are also applicable earlier in the course of the illness, in conjunction with anticancer treatment. Palliative care neither hastens nor postpones death; it integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care; and offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death. Before palliative care was founded about 30 years ago, dying patients were left to, well, die. Nowadays they are eligible for radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery, provided that the symptomatic benefits of treatment clearly outweigh the disadvantages. Investigative procedures are kept to a minimum. The professional team includes: physicians, nurses, psychologists, social workers, bereavement coordinators (identify patients at risk for prolonged grief), pastoral care, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, music therapists, volunteer coordinators, volunteers, secretaries, and pet therapists. Ethics Ethics is a set of principles of right conduct. It is also the study of the general nature of morals and of the specific moral choices to be made by a person or the moral philosophy. Medical ethics is the rules or standards governing the conduct of a person or the members of a profession. In the clinical context, the bottom line in ethics is proper communication. Oftentimes, ethical dilemmas result from a breakdown in communication—e.g. unresponsive patients, difference between family’s and doctor’s opinion, miscommunication, etc.
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Tuesday, April 1, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 22) Dr. Borod Principles of Ethics There are 4 basic principles: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. Autonomy is the recognition of an individual’s right and ability to decide for him or herself according to beliefs, values, and a life plan. Patients’ decisions are uniquely their own and may sometimes be different from the course that is advised or deemed wise in a given situation.
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