BASC_201_-_Lecture_23_(Apr_3_-_Dr._Borod)

BASC_201_-_Lecture_23_(Apr_3_-_Dr._Borod) - 23 8 Thursday...

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Thursday, April 3, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 23) Dr. Borod 8 APRIL 3, 2008 – Dr. Borod 23
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Thursday, April 3, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 23) Dr. Borod Ethics in Palliative Care Announcements Ampersand launch party next Tuesday! Free food and drinks will be served. Secondly, order your BASc sweatshirts online for $42, tax incl. Ethical Principles While palliative care is not just limited to oncology, cancer does make up the majority of the cases in palliative care. In 2005 there were 1,372,910 new cases of cancer a year are diagnosed in America. Every year there are about 570,280 deaths from cancer. Editorial notes: prostate cancer is the leading cancer diagnosis for males and breast cancer for females. However, lung cancer is the leading cause of death because the stage diction is the most distant—i.e. lung cancer travels furthest. Prostate and breast cancer, on the other hand, is usually localized. A new vision of palliative care. Early involvement in palliative care can allow for the complete and adequate care of the patient and the family from the period of diagnosis until after death. (instead of the beginning of life closure.) Review of ethical terms: Autonomy : the recognition of the individual’s right and ability to decide for him or herself according to beliefs, values, and their life plan. Their decisions are their own; Beneficence : to do good; Non-maleficence : to not inflict evil; Justice: to treat patients fairly and give them what they rightfully deserve and remember that there is a limit as to what the healthcare team can offer patients Dilemma: when faced with choices that are equally unfavorable or mutually exclusive. Case # 1: Ethical Dilemma 55 year old Italian male. (General observation: Italians don’t like to talk about death very much) Diagnosed with lung cancer 4 months PTA. Presents to ER with confusion and ataxia (losing balance.) MRI reveals brain metastases (cancer spread to brain—poor prognosis.) Family does not want patient to know the extent of his disease—he will give up hope and die. Framing the question. Perhaps it is respecting the autonomy of the patient (or the family) or non-maleficence.
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Thursday, April 3, 2008 (BASC 201: Lecture 23) Dr. Borod Use the decision making model form the previous lecture. One must use the relevant information to build a case.
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