dominance behavior lab - Munira Jesani BIO 206L- Susan...

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Munira Jesani BIO 206L- Susan Banks 4/12/07 Dominance Behavior of the Common Cricket ( Gryllus domesticus )
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Results and Analysis a) b) Before beginning the experiment, dominance behavior terms commonly used with crickets were defined. Once these behaviors were defined, we could make a hypothesis about the dominance behavior of male crickets. We hypothesized that the males would show more dominance behavior if there was only one female amongst them, than they would show if there was one female for every male. This hypothesis would be very simple to conduct and observe, and was very clear and concise. The dependent and independent variables were clearly distinguished and defined, and since the hypothesis was so simple, it could easily be tested. First, we isolated three male crickets in a plastic box, and allowed them to adjust to their new environments for about ten minutes. This gave them time to realize where they were, that they could not get out, and that they were each with two other
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course BIO 206L taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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dominance behavior lab - Munira Jesani BIO 206L- Susan...

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