Tempest Essay TII 1 - Padmanaban!1 Avinash Padmanaban Ms.Engerran English 10B Period 4 T\/Th 18 May 2015 Racism and Rape Shakespeares Portrayal of

Tempest Essay TII 1 - Padmanaban!1 Avinash Padmanaban...

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Padmanaban 1 Avinash Padmanaban Ms.Engerran English 10B, Period 4 T/Th 18 May 2015 Racism and Rape: Shakespeare’s Portrayal of Prospero and Caliban Few men live alongside those who have caused harm to their own family. In William Shakespeare’s play, The Tempest, Prospero, the exiled Duke of Milan, attempts to protect his daughter, Miranda, through illusion and skillful manipulation of Caliban. During the lifetime of Shakespeare in England, many changes were occurring on many fronts. Shakespeare demonstrates his fascination in a world full of mysteries possibilities with this play. Prospero treats Caliban harshly for three reasons: he is angry about Caliban’s attack on Miranda, he regards Caliban as a savage who must be kept in check, and his display of superiority over Caliban. Prospero treats Caliban poorly as Caliban had once attempted to rape Prospero’s daughter, Miranda. As Prospero wants nothing more besides “side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up; urchins/ Shall, for that vast of night that they may work,/ All exercise on thee; thou shalt be pinch’d/ As thick as honeycomb, each pinch more stinging/ Than bees that made ‘em” (1.2.331-345). As you can see Prospero is looking for reasons to punish Caliban to the incident occurring with Miranda. As Miranda is his daughter, like any father, Prospero wants the assurance of nothing more than his daughter’s safety. When Caliban attacked Miranda, he revealed that “most lying slave,/ Whom stripes may move, not kindness! [Caliban] have used thee,/ Filth as thou art, with human/ care, and lodged

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