Module 55-56 - attractive and there is no prior commitment to a group Reactance-a desire to protect or restore one’s freedom of action Social

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Psychology 101 Module 55- Social Thinking Attribution Theory - how we explain someone’s behavior (by crediting situation or disposition) Fundamental Attribution Error - overestimating the influence of personality and underestimating the influence of situations Foot in the Door Phenomenon- a tendency for people who agree to a small action to comply later with a larger one Cognitive Dissonance Theory - we often bring our attitudes into line with out actions developed by Leon Festinger (war in Iraq) Module 56- Social Influence The Chameleon Effect- natural mimics the most empathetic people mimic Normative Social Influence- sensitive to social norms (accepts and expected behaviors) Informational Social Influence - accepting others opinions about reality *Stanley Milgram people often comply with social pressures **Conformity increases when the group is unanimous, the response is public, group is
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Unformatted text preview: attractive, and there is no prior commitment to a group Reactance-a desire to protect or restore one’s freedom of action Social Facilitation- stronger performance in the presence of others Social Loafing-tendency for people in a group to exert less effort when pooling their efforts toward attaining a common goal that when individually accountable Deindividuation- the loss of self- awareness and self-restraint occurring in group situations that foster arousal and anonymity Group Polarization- the enhancement of a group’s prevailing inclinations through discussion within the group Groupthink- the mode of thinking that occurs when the desire for harmony in a decision-making group overrides a realistic appraisal of alternatives...
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This test prep was uploaded on 09/18/2007 for the course PSYCH 1101 taught by Professor Maas, j during the Fall '06 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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