Steering_Gear_v1 - Maritime Professional Studies KP100...

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Steering Gear v1.doc-8/10/2004 Maritime Professional Studies KP100 Introduction to Marine Engineering (IME) Segment Course Handout I. Topic Name: Steering Gear II. Reference(s) Text: Ship Knowledge A Modern Encyclopedia Pages: 264-265 III. Topic Objectives A. Identify the major types of steering gear B. Identify the steering mode that is used during each of the following ship’s operations: 1. Maneuvering 2. Normal underway C. Identify locations on a ship where a steering gear may be operated
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COURSE HANDOUT: Steering Gear Steering Gear v1.doc-8/10/2004 2 IV. Topic Terminology axial motion bearing, journal closed system (or cycle) cylinder electrical energy electro-hydraulic electro-hydraulic steering emergency steering energy, electrical energy, mechanical gyro steering hand steering hydraulic link steering gear lube oil mechanical energy motive force non-followup steering (helm) non-followup steering (local) pump pump, positive displacement pump, rotary radial motion rapson slide steering gear rotary vane steering gear rudder rudder stock steering gear
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COURSE HANDOUT: Steering Gear Steering Gear v1.doc-8/10/2004 3 V. Topic Materials & Information A. Types of Steering Gear 1. Rapson slide 2. Rotary vane 3. Link (uncommon) B. Steering modes 1. Gyro a. This mode utilizes the ships gyro compass to set and maintain the ship’s course. b. The ship’s course is dialed in by the mate on watch or helmsman; this action automatically moves the rudder to cause the ships course to change. Once the desired course is achieved the rudder automatically returns to a zero angle position. c. This is the normal mode of steering during underway operations 2. Hand a. The ships course is set by the helmsman by physically turning the ship’s wheel. b. The amount of rudder movement is dependant upon the amount the ship’s wheel is turned. Once the desired course is achieved the helmsman manually zeroes the rudder by turning the ship’s wheel until a zero rudder angle is achieved. c. This is the normal mode of steering during maneuvering operations. 3. Non-Follow Up: Helm a. Commonly referred to as (remote) NFU steering mode b. The ship’s course is set by the helmsman through manual operation of a spring-loaded switch at the helm. c. Rudder positioning, including zeroing of the rudder, must be performed manually; no automatic means for zeroing of the rudder exists in this mode. 4.
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course KP 100 taught by Professor Lenord during the Fall '06 term at United States Merchant Marine Academy.

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Steering_Gear_v1 - Maritime Professional Studies KP100...

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