DV - Domestic Violence Epidemic 1 Running Head Domestic...

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Domestic Violence Epidemic 1 Running Head: Domestic Violence Epidemic Domestic Violence Epidemic The Problem in Minnesota and Services Provided Megan Kellen SOWK 190W: Social Welfare Services Dr. Paul F.E. Mackie Minnesota State University, Mankato April 8 th , 2006
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Domestic Violence Epidemic 2 I. Introduction and Statement of Purpose Domestic violence is a serious, widespread social welfare problem in Minnesota today. In this paper, I will be describing the problem of domestic violence in adult relationships and services that are available for victims in Minnesota. There are many misconceptions about domestic violence. Firstly, the problem is more widespread than people think and can affect virtually anyone. The abuser can also, be anyone. Domestic abuse is not just about physical violence, it is about having power and control in a relationship. Lastly, people frequently think that the only service available for abused women and their children are shelters. However, other services include community advocacy programs, culturally specific programs, criminal justice intervention programs and shelter programs. We need some serious priority checks in our government and in our society in order to stop domestic violence. II. Explanation of the Problem In a typical domestic violence situation, the man of the house or relationship is the abuser and the women and children who live with or close to him, are being abused. When most people think about domestic abuse, they think of physical violence. In fact, domestic violence can come in forms of “emotional abuse, economic abuse, sexual abuse, using children, threats, using mail privilege, intimidation, isolation, and a variety of other behaviors used to maintain fear, intimidation and power” (Louisiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence) Domestic violence is not just about the physical abuse and violence, it is about psychological control and power in a relationship.
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Domestic Violence Epidemic 3 “Throughout recorded history, domestic violence has occurred in societies in which women are considered to be subordinate to men” (Zahm) Historians point out that there are four concepts that shaped the belief that med are superior to women. The first concept, hierarchy, is a system in which a few authoritative people govern the way other people under them live their lives. They control “basic resources such as food, property, shelter, medicine, transportation, education, money, and jobs” (Zahm). The people who hold the power can only be born into it. In the case of domestic violence, it would mean being born a male. It is very difficult, next to impossible, to ascend to this higher position of power if not born into it. The second reason for men to be subordinate to women is the concept of patriarchy. This is similar to hierarchy but also incorporates gender to their specifications of a ruler in higher power. Typically, this also means being born male and withholding opportunities from females. The third concept is misogyny. This is an idea of
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course SOWK 190 taught by Professor Mackie during the Spring '08 term at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

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DV - Domestic Violence Epidemic 1 Running Head Domestic...

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