Chapter5 - Chapter 5 The American Revolution 1 What was the...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 5: The American Revolution 1. What was the ideal of “homespun virtue” and how did it appeal to different groups in the colonies? The idea of the homespun virtue was reliance on homespun clothing rather than imported finery became a symbol of American resistance and it reflected as a virtuous spirit of self­sacrifice. Women who spun at home were hailed as the Daughter of Liberty. The idea of using homemade rather than imported goods appealed to the Chesapeake planters, who had a debt with British merchants. By reducing the purchase of British luxuries would reduce his expenses without his neighbors knowing he was in financial distress. Virginia leaders announced a temporary ban on importation of slaves, planters in Piedmont region where the institution was expanding ignored the request. Urban artisan, who welcomed an end to competition from imported British manufactured goods, supported the boycott. Philadelphia and New York merchants were reluctant to take a part at first but eventually went along with it. 2. Patrick Henry proclaimed that he was not a Virginian, but rather an American. What unified the colonists and what divided them at the time of the Revolution? What unified the colonists was that they believed they had similar culture as their mother country although they were so far away from Britain. They were divided due to the taxing of imported printing goods, and the Stamp Act was the first major split. 3. Discuss the ramifications of using slaves in the British and Continental Armies. Why did the British authorize the use of slaves? Why did the Americans? How did the slaves benefit? In the beginning of the war, George Washington didn’t allow any blacks to join his army. In 1775, Lord Dunmore offered freedom to slaves who joined the British side. This made George Washington change his mind about blacks being able to join. About 5,000 blacks joined state Militias and Continental Army. Men who were drafted into the Militia were allowed to submit a substitute if they did not wish to join. This gave the slaves a lot of power because they gained freedom and many slave owners avoided war this way. 4. Why did the colonists reach the conclusion that membership in the empire threatened their freedoms, rather than guaranteed them? The colonists reached their conclusion that the membership was a threat to their freedom because they studied the writings of British opposition thinkers who insisted that power inevitably seeks to encroach upon liberty, colonial leaders came to see these measures as a part of a British design to undermine their freedom. Having only recently glorified in their enjoyment of “British Liberty,” they came to conclude that membership in the empire was a threat to freedom, rather than its foundation. This conviction set the colonies on the road to independence. 5. How did new ideas of liberty contribute to tensions between the social classes in the American colonies? New ideas and issues affected the social classes, customs, gender and racial roles in the American colonies. Higher classes in many colonists wanted to keep their nobility without dismantling the social class. they didn't like a new government because they considered everyone as equals except for slavery. There was no titled nobility that dominated society from on high and no underclass that threatened it from below​. 6. Why did people in other countries believe that the American Revolution (or the Declaration of Independence) was important to them or their own countries? Liberty had become a universal entitlement. The principle that legitimate political authority rests on the will of the people and that people possess rights has been adopted around the world. Slaves and Indigenous inhabitants all spoke this language, to the dismay of those who exercised power over them. The American revolution influenced big movements around the world, this began with the ideals of liberty and a self determination fought for in the american revolution. 7. Summarize the difference of opinion between British officials and colonial leaders over the issues of taxation and representation? Americans viewed the British government as a collection of equals. Americans believed that colonists should have the same rights as those in England. Other colonists in India, the West Indies and Canada also shared this view. Colonists believed they should handle their own matters. Those settlers who lived in Calcutta, India demanded the “rights inherent in Englishmen”. In Quebec the colonists didn’t want to follow French laws because they compared them to “slavery”. The British government believed all areas should be governed by different standards, if they waived taxation it would weaken the empire. Because they weren’t represented in the House of Commons the Americans didn’t not feel as if they had to pay taxes. “No taxation without representation” became the expression of the Americans. 8. How did the actions of the British authorities help to unite the American colonists during the1760s and 1770s? ​ The British authorities set the new laws to make financial supports to the colonists in 1760 to 1763. In 1764, the British authorities started the Sugar Act to reduce the existing tax, and started a Revenue Act to place goods to the American colonists. Although the British authorities threatened the profits of colonial merchants, the money were as the payment of debts. In 1765, the British authorities started the Stamp Act which was by imposing the stamp tax without colonial consent to get the meaning of freedom. In 1767, the during Townshend Acts, the British authorities imposed a series of taxes on all goods imported into the colonists. In 1768, the British authorities troops stationed in Boston and in 1770, the British authorities massacred Boston people for calming down the some instability region of Boston. ...
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