310_Note_Pages_Lecture_8_Political_Parties_F06

310_Note_Pages_Lecture_8_Political_Parties_F06 - Political...

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Unformatted text preview: Political Parties Republican National Committee | 3 GOV 310 Dr. Gary A. Keith Lecture 8 Lecture Outline I. II. III. IV. V. Party Arenas Party Organization Party and Democracy Party Functions Party Systems Party in the Electorate Party Identification Partisanship as Identity http:// www.conservativematch.com/?referrer_code =google;campaign_code= conservative_singles Approximately one third/one third/one third Party in Government http://dccc.org/ http://nrcc.org/ Lecture Outline I. Party Arenas II. III. IV. V. Party Organization Party and Democracy Party Functions Party Systems Party HQ http://www.democrats.org/ http://www.gop.org/ From Grassroots to National Conventions Parties organized from the bottom up Temporary organization--conventions Permanent organization--committees and officials Organization of American Political Parties http://www.laits.utexas.edu/gov310/PP/partyor Lecture Outline I. II. Party Arenas Party Organization Party Functions Party Systems III. IV. V. Party and Democracy Parties and the Founders Madison: "mischiefs of faction" Washington: Let me now ... warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party..." Madison, Hamilton, Jefferson: faction organizers Parties and Democracy Schattschneider: Parties created democracy, and democracy is unthinkable without them (in Party Government) Parties and Democracy Gerald Pomper: popular sovereignty, popular consultation, majority rule are all tied to parties. Responsible Parties Parties and Madison's economic factionalism V.O. Key E.E. Schattschneider Lecture Outline I. II. III. Party Arenas Party Organization Party and Democracy Party Systems IV. V. Party Functions Party functions 1. Electing 2. Representing 3. Organizing 4. Competing 5. Opposing 1. Electing One president, from one party U.S. Senate: 55 Republicans, 44 Democrats, 1 known formerly as a Republican U.S. House: 232 R's, 202 D's, 1 I 2. Representing Descriptive? Substantive? 3. Public Opinion and Democracy Democracy requires a role for public opinion Parties organize public opinion Pressure (interest) groups organize public opinion 4. Parties and Competition It's not enough to have A party... Lack of party competition= suppression of conflicts. 4. Parties and Competition How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America? In Vermont, they take their labels seriously. The state has an independent U.S. senator (former Republican James M. Jeffords) and an independent House member (selfproclaimed socialist Bernard Sanders). Now, according to the Burlington Free Press, an independent has filed for governor joining Republican incumbent Jim Douglas and Democrat Peter Clavelle, a Libertarian Party candidate, a Liberty Union candidate, and a candidate who lists her affiliation as "Marijuana." Only a furious writein campaign undertaken in the Sept. 14 primary election by the Progressive Party prevented Liberty Union Party leaders from sneaking into Progressive slots on the ballot for governor and House (the Progressives back Clavelle and Sanders for those jobs.) "Having folks run under the Progressive Party label without being Progressives hurts our party's identity and ultimately is a disservice to voters," said Martha Abbott, the party's chairwoman. CQ Today September 21, 2004 4. Parties and Competition 5. Government and Opposition In a democracy, how do you effectively oppose the government? Why would people want to oppose government? What kind of organization and mobilization of opposition? Lecture Outline I. II. III. IV. Party Arenas Party Organization Party and Democracy Party Functions V. Party Systems American Parties...and the march of democracy Burnham's party eras http://www.laits.utexas.edu/gov310/PP/partysys American Parties...and the march of democracy Inevitability of two parties in American politics Third Parties Key Third Party Efforts American Parties...and the march of democracy 1848 1856 1860 1892 1912 1924 1968 1980 1992 10% Free Soil (Van Buren) 21% Whig American (Fillmore) 5 parties 9% Populist (Weaver) 27% Progressive (Roosevelt) 6% Socialist (Debs) 17% 14% 7% 19% Progressive (LaFollette) American Independent (Wallace) Independent (Anderson) Independent (Perot) American Parties...and the march of democracy Inevitability of two parties in American politics Third Parties Competition in a oneparty system Dealignment ...
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