Lecture 13 - SOCIOLOGY 3AC Professor Brian Powers Lecture 13 Sharing or distribution of lecture notes or sharing of your subscription is ILLEGAL

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
SOCIOLOGY 3AC Professor Brian Powers 9/24/07 Lecture 13 Sharing or distribution of lecture notes, or sharing of your subscription, is ILLEGAL and will be prosecuted. Our non-profit, student-run program depends on your individual subscription for its continued existence. These notes are copyrighted by the University of California and are for your personal use only. Sharing or copying these notes is illegal and could end note taking for this course ANNOUNCEMENTS I am not going to show the remaining segments of 42 Up today; I want to go over the interview in class. I want one person to volunteer to be interviewed in front of the class. If you think you could be interviewed in front of the class, not because you enjoy the limelight, but because you could answer truthfully and you are sociologically interesting, write your name on a piece of paper and send it forward. Reader. I believe that the reader is now available. Start to review it. If you did not buy the reader, now is the time to do it because you are going to need it. One of the tasks I have in mind is that I want you to scan through all of those tables and charts on the state of working America, and I want you to write down five things that you learned about trends in the distribution of income in the U.S. by the end of this week. Extension on Table Assignment. Friday, we were scheduled to receive your tables one and two. Bspace has not been very up to speed with its assignment tab, and they are going to do this big upgrade on Friday evening. So, we have decided to change the data submission of tables one and two to Monday in class, and I will post this up on assignments at Bspace under the tab for submitting tables one and two. LECTURE Division of Labor in the Household. There is a question about the household—how much work do men in the household do? Is it 25% or 30% or 50%? What is household labor? That is all the labor that is involved in maintaining the household. This is the work inside the home—the laundry, cooking, planning, dishes, pets, correspondence to Aunt Mabel, birthday party arrangements, and making doctors’ appointments. I want you to recognize that all of that is work regardless of whether someone gets a paycheck. Society counts on laundry to get done so people’s clothes will be clean. We count on the fact that laundry is being done somewhere by someone. The question is why is household labor sex identified? I want you to make an estimate based on your household performance. Is work allocated to the men or the women? In order to launch us into the interview and into your study, here are a couple of things you should find interesting. Selection into Colleges. This is an article by my friend and colleague that appeared in today’s New York Times. It is all about how people get into college, and if the process of selecting people fair. We all know that it is not even debatable how unfair
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course SOC 3 taught by Professor Don'tremember during the Fall '04 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Page1 / 5

Lecture 13 - SOCIOLOGY 3AC Professor Brian Powers Lecture 13 Sharing or distribution of lecture notes or sharing of your subscription is ILLEGAL

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online