First day materials, Comp I-3 - Professor Roger W Forsythe...

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Unformatted text preview: Professor Roger W. Forsythe . Name “Freshman English Composition 1”. . Room J-126; Adjunct Office: E-214 . . Percentage Scale; Email: rforsxt_h‘ [email protected]' 90% - 100% = A ' ' p ‘ 80%_- 89%=B 70% - 79% = C Grading of Linked Response/Reading/ Writings 50% -. 69% = D ’ Below 60% =' F Total Points for Category _ Pts. Purpose Organization Paragraph(s) Sentences Word Choice Editing (if applicable) Statement of Good transition(s) Understands the revision Overview of writing _Varied sentence Specific, vivid purpose is is clear to reader. between structure: simple, language and often process. Utilize personal ~ , within first Purpose of writing is paragraphs. Clear compound, and imaginative(creative checklist. Uses ‘best 9 paragraph and developed in a topic sentence(s). complex sentences. language. Has reader- personal practice”: intemet is clearly focused, imaginative, Major and minor Identifies and uses oriented transitions. reader, proof and reader, defined, and meaningful way. supporting " necessary transitions general reader, backwards specific, and Support clearlyt material between ideas. reading. Revises for purpose, relevant. related to purpose effectively \ _Subject/verb organization, clarity, errors, Indicates ‘ statement. explains topic agreement and proofreading. Identifies appropriate ‘ sentence(s). Main _Pronoun/antecedent almost all errors. Revises to scope for , idea(s) specifically agreement clarify. writing. related to purpose _Transitions within Reader- of writing. paragraph oriented. Statement of Overview of writing. Competent _A variety of Appropriate standard Identifies and uses “best purpose is Competent, specific, transitions. Strong sentence structures. English (when personal practice.” Uses clearly and relevant support topic Competent use of applicable). Avoids personal checklist. Revises a ’4, relevant and of the paper’s sentence(s).Topic introductory personal pronouns. as above. Finds a / specific. purpose statement. sentences control phrase(s). Word choice is considerable amount of / Appropriately Relevance of support the subject matter. _Subject/verb specific and relevant errors. Finds most errors on 5' limits scope clear to reader. Support develops agreement to topic. In general, personal checklist. Revises of writing. the idea of the _Pronoun/antecedent uses adequate to clarify. ’ Reader- paragraph. agreement transitions. Some transitions _Competent use of oriented. Statement of Scope of writing Occasional slang, Basic understanding of purpose is one clear. Uses relevant _Competent topic the simple and idioms, “general revision. Revises for purpose main idea but and adequate support sentence(s). compound sentences. you,” and personal and support. Mainly sees may be too material. _Adequate support _May have pronouns. Use of revision as finding errors and general in Occasionally may of topic sentence. occasional syntax signal-word proofreading. Successfully nature. May have implied relation errors. transitions. corrects top-two on personal be, at times, of support to purpose _May have checklist. Has worked to writer- of writing. transitions gain understanding of oriented. personal errors. Revises to correct. Statement of Support is too _Heavy reliance on Use of confused Needs to gain understanding _ purpose general or vague in _May have very simple sentences. words and idiomatic of importance of purpose and addresses nature (little or no general topic _Irregularities in phrases. Does not organization. Must work to assignment, specific support). sentence(s). sentence structure. understand gain concept of writing as but contains Support not related _Uses little or no _May have some connotations. May process. May understand more than one to purpose of support material. verb or pronoun use vague verbs, rudimentary errors on - ) purpose writing. problems nouns, and/or checklist, but not and/or is too modifiers. Needs internalized to writing. vague. Is not transitions. reader- ' oriented. Statement of Must concentrate on understanding of Word usage is not specific and word Frequent but varied problems with Support for purpose of writing is Topic sentence(s) is (are) unclear or 7 : purpose . . . . ‘ unclear/does presented in a vague irrelevant. sentence structure. _ chorce may create rudimentary process of not address or ambiguous way. _Lacks unity wordiness, revision. Cannot identify personal errors, even given checklist and re - etition. No revision monotony, and/or re o etition. Uses inappropriate and/or confusing language. assignment. and/or coherence. Serious problems with sentence structure. No clear focus within paragraph(s). Statement of purpose is absent. Support is missing or irrelevant. GPA na}.,+r _) \dni Ifl n\\-~l-r~‘-"" I'll-1i ikQ’M-Pf Professor Roger W. Forsythe “Freshman English Composition I_” ; Room J- 126; Adjunct Office: E—214 E—zmail: rforsflhel @edison. edu Focus on Topic There rs one clear. well-focused topic (Contemi ' Main idea stands out and is - i .i’i‘flfi {‘5 supported by ———-——-..--" detailed information. Support for Relevant, telling. .- Topic (Content) quality details give 3 the reader . important ‘ 1 information that a“ W474“ goes beyond the ' .' ' obvious or predictable. Q Flow & Rhythm ' All sentences .. (Sentence sound natural and are easy-on-the-ear FIUGNCY) when read aloud. Each sentence is Six ’9) clear and has an . obvious emphasis. D Sequencing Details are placed _ . in a logical order (Organization) and the way they are presented __ quM_ g , effectiy..el.y,,ke.epsRw the interest of the reader. E Grammar & Writer makes no Spelling ‘ errors In grammar or spelling that (Conventions) distract the reader Percentage Scale: 90% - 100% = A (“47‘ 80%.: 89% = B ”'9' _70%- 79%= C fi IH—«LS' l 50%-.69%=D. ,- Below 60% = F -—-—§ Main idea is clear but the supporting information is general. Supporting details and information are relevant. but one key - issue or portion of the storyline is unsupported. Almost all sentences sound natural and are easy-on-the-ear when read aloud. but 1 or 2 are stiff and awkward or difficult to understand. Details are placed in a logical order. but the way in.which they are presentedfintroduced , _s_ometim.e.smak_es_ttie_, writing less interesting. Writer makes 1-2 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Main idea is The main idea is somewhat clear but not clear. There is a there is a need for seemingly random more supporting collection of information. information. Supporting details Supporting details ' and information are and infonnatlon are relevant. but several typically unclear or key issues or not related to the portions of the topic. storyline are unsupported. Most sentences The sentences are sound natural and difficult to read are easy-on-the-ear aloud because they when read aloud. sound awkward. ar , but several are stiff distractinglyl and awkward or are repetitive. or difficult , - difficult to ' to understand. - understand. Some details are Many details are not in a logical or not in a logical or . expected order. and expected order. this distracts the There is little sense Leader. - _- matjbemruingj_s_ organized. Writer makes 3-4 Writer makes more errors in grammar or than 4 errors in --spelling that distract grammar or spelling the reader from the that distract the content. 'reader from the A 95) éN/WENT 6w DEL/IVES When answering assigned guestions, students are to write in complete sentences, restate or rephrase the question as part of their answer, and to answer all that is being asked. Each assigned question is worth two points with an additional two points to cover overall grammar on the paper. Students lose one point for a wrong answer, not answering the question(s) in full, or for having run-ons or fragments. The first (of four) 700—800 word, 100—goint major essay is a narrative essay. This may be an autobiographical narrative based on something that, at one point, caused them to re—evaluate or change their minds about a life situation, event, or person. Or it may be fictional. It is an open form essay, and on the first day of class they are told that the first two essays “do not even have to take place on this planet," if they choose. , abThe second 100- oint ma'or essa is a descri tive essa and, ratherthan tell a story, their goal is to make their readers feel as if they are immersed in the scene they have described through their incorporation of concrete, specific descriptive details and “showing" of each of the five senses. They are, in short, to make a “picture” come to life. The third 100—point maior essay is a literary analysis based on cue of the four Ernest Hemingway short stories studied in class. Both this and the argumentative/persuasive essay are closed form essays that require students to clearly state and set out to prove an arguable thesis. Students are required to follow the nine guidelines for writing a literary analysis essay—Le, an original title, cite quotes to support their thesis, write in the "literary present”—and to organize an outline in advance. Their goal is to prove through evidence that their interpretation of the story’s meaning or author’s intent is valid. The final 100—Qoint major essay is a research argumentative or persuasive essay that follows MLA format and cites at least four sources, with one of those sources being a book. Students are assigned to follow the sample argumentative/persuasive outline format covered in class by opening with a lead that draws the reader in, providing a brief background or context on the issue they set out to resolve, defining any terms not familiar to the average person on the street, presenting their second strongest argument first, saving their strongest argument for last, countering the opposition, and providing evidence or statistics to support each section of their essay. “Introductory Essay” (200 words, 15 points): Students are assigned to write a ZOO—word introductory essay (organized into at least two or three paragraphs and with an original title) briefly addressing in a sentence or two each of the five major points: brief background, hobbies and interests, writing strengths and weaknesses, reading habits for leisure and/or favorites, and career and/or degree goals. This is what is referred to as a “honeymoon” assignment in that as long as students follow directions and touch on all five points they will receive full credit despite the number of editing marks that must be made on the work. “Educated Response” Essay (200 words, 20 points): Students are assigned to read the Writer’s Digest article entitled “25 Quick Tips to Improve Your Writing Now" as well as the three Oatmeal.com links posted as a Canvas announcement on the proper use of the apostrophe, semi—colon, and “who” versus “whom.” Students are then assigned to write an “educated response” essay, detailing the five specific things they learned that will help them to improve their writing. The essay will be organized into at least three paragraphs and have an original title, a clear thesis, and an interesting lead. “Five Senses/Five Compound or Complex Sentences” Assignment (200 words, 25 points): Students are assigned to descriptively show something in detail using one, each, of the five senses. Students who may struggle with writing a compound or complex sentence should write two simple sentences describing something that they smell, taste, touch, hear, or see; these sentences may be about the same thing or each be about something different. Due at the same time as the first draft of the major descriptive essay and to be used as the basis for the second in—class peer editing workshop, these sentences may be excerpted from that larger assignment; students who do not repeat their work will receive an additional five points to their score. For this assignment, the ZOO—word rubric is used, but the “five senses" sentences are graded, each, on a 5-point scale with a 5 representing work that is clearly A level in its use of concrete, vivid details, clarity, grammar, and flow of expression; a 4 representing work that is clearly B level in that it approaches but does not quite reach top tier work with its “showing” descriptive details, flow, and/or use of grammar; a 3 representing clearly C level (or average) work in that it may lack concrete descriptive details, “tell" more than “show," have syntax issues, and/or have basic grammar problems; a 2 representing clearly D level (or below average) work in that readability is impaired by numerous grammar mistakes and little effort is made to “show” and not “tell” by, instead, relying on clichés or empty intensifiers; and a 1 representing clearly unacceptable F level work in that the student has exerted little effort, did not understand the assignment, or may require tutorial assistance. “Ironic" Literary Analysis Essay (200 words, 20 points): Students are assigned to write a ZOO-word literary analysis of Alanis Morrissette’s song “Ironic,” using the posted Oatmealcom link entitled “The Three Common Uses of Irony” to determine (or argue) how many of the scenarios described in the song actually fit the definition of “irony.” Their paper should follow the nine guidelines of writing a literary analysis essay. ' “Writing Journal” component of the major essay folders: For each of the four major essay folders, students are assigned to compile into a two— pocket folder the rough and final drafts, an outline, and the 10 point “Writing Journal,” which is comprised of four parts: spelling words, development of vocabulary, identification of grammatical problem areas, and self-evaluation. Both drafts should have a word count and an arrow marking the essay’s half—way point. .2 @H/fi W053] Qfdvges m : Cjflfla‘} I; 2 e, 167L7L9f/ MM Tiffadtw’e i“ E . ' . 1 ‘_ Q \[ '13: \féwk '7‘? mge §Jgfi€+ : @33va W ‘_”~fl_.,,_.__._w- -----~--'"--'--~ ”fw'r-‘Wf—w—m«~m.m_m______u____wm~ . _ J/ :Ww:f:fgfl ,, A v ‘ (12 a: 5371:? ' WW”: Wk Wk W Ta» 6L @jfiflfiifl-J: - ‘V‘Zgfi 229:: -. \x/UWA QEO/QQ/ Y‘fl flf ”0 ‘ H'WCL: "22 0 2,2(1:V\S*E’/71 Commm/ )DQv’r/J/Aéfiomleca m. (? :— Q 7hCI€R/_ Ciafl\'} (Ga/I». AHAHVL QHAM/ i h: ~ 'Lifelong' Learning Put Your Writing on a Diet ' By Martha Brockenbrough If you were like mein high school, and your teacher assigned you a five—page paper, you might have resorted to a féw tricks to make sure you hit your length: liberal use of the word “very," 14-point fans and -- If you were crafty -- tweaking the fonts to put extra 5 p a c e between your letters. ' One nice thing about the real world is that people generally ' prefer shorter writing. No one wans a five-page document where a single-pager will do. It's notjust because we have flea-sized attention spans, or because we've'grown used to typing shrthnd txt msgs. It's because time is precious, and the quicker we get'the information we need, the better. Summarizing complicated ideasin plain English isn't easy, but; do have a few tips, courtesy of the Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar. 1. Skip the Latin A lot of those long words that sounded so erudite smart-in your school papers just take up extra space in your professional writing —— and they make it harder for people to understand what'you're saying. Many of these words come from Latin, and are longer and harder to grasp-than their Anglo-Saxon counterparts. It's fine to ‘want to sound smart, but you shouldn't let this get in the way of your readers' understanding. Here's a list of Latin words and some simpler alternatives; - Abdomen -— use belly . Assist -- use help - Canine -- use dog - Cognizant -- use aware - Comprehend —- use understand ' - Desire —- use wish - Fraternal -- use brotherly - Liberate -,- use free - Presume -- use guess - Prior to —- use before - Prohibit -- use forbid There are many more, of course. And if you can get into the habit of saving your Latin for your priest, your writing will be more-concise shorter and easier to comprehend understand. ' '2. Cut the cliché We've all heard the . ar'guments that cliche‘s are bad because they're stale expressions. True enough. What's worse, though, is that they're often the longestpath to the end'of a.sentence. Why write “weather the storm" when you could say "survive"? Here are some other chubby ciichés and their leane replacements: ' - Having a full plate --' use busy . . - Leaving no stone unturned —- use thorough . Let the cat outofth'e' bag —- use re've'al' - Mop/Wipe the floor with -— use defeat, rout, clobber - Out of the running -- us‘e eliminated, defeated - Pick someone's brain -- use discuss, question - Sorry- state of affairs -- use pathetic - Spill the beans -— use reveal - Start from scratch —- use start over,~begin agaln - Throw your hat in the ring --'use try 3. Use plain instead of fancy language It's easy to get used to phrases that sound smart but really just clog your Writing. Here's a list of bloated expressions and shorter alternatives, recommended by the Federal Aviation Administration's plain-writing guide: - Accordingly -- use so - Addressees -- use you - As a means of -- use to - As prescribed by -- use in, under - At a later date -— use later” - At the present time —- use now - Commence -— use begin, start 4. Try these editing tricks Microsoft Word lets you search for common bloated expressions and edit them out. Here are a few examples: To be, or be plus ~ing: "I should be cleaning my gutters." -"I should clean my gutters." "I need to be cleaning my gutters." "I need to clean my gutters." Began/started: "He began to understand how to'write shorter sentences." "He understood how to write shorter sentences." Could/would: Can often be cut. "He would swim daily in the pool." "He swam daily in the pool." “She could see his Speedo." "She saw his Speedo." Just, essentially, actually, basically, real/”totally, quite, very, extremely, moreover, as it Were, it can be seen that/should be noted that: Often these words are - just filler. 'Overdescr‘ibing: Giravedanger -- is there any other kind? Likewise, exact copy and free gift are redundant. That: Used more than is necessary. "I knew that he was a pastry chef." "I knew he was a pastry chef." There are/these are/this is: Very often, these Hie-the signal of flabby formations, To the: Little words that add little meaning. "I have lost many pieces to the puzzle." "1 have lost many puzzle pieces." If you can. master these tips, chances are you‘ll be writing well on the job -~ and saving a lot of paper in the process. Related Links -- A selection of Latin phrases and what they'rnean 0 What‘s Anglo-Saxon, and how is it part of the history of English? ' I Where can I learn more about plain language? 0 In Defense of the Ciiché ling Comp I, Forsythe l-l 1-08 ' This one was particularly impressive. It was a Toyota Land Cruiser with an open top, and four rows of seats. I hadn’t seen it until that day that we crossed the river on the pontoon boat and walked the twenty meters under the Acacia Treesinto the little clearing. There were maybe ten of us total: an Indian Family, a white South African named Paul, and the two black Zambians. The Zambians drove and spotted. Paul and I sat behind them. The sky was its signature crimson from the sand, like it is almost every evening in the bush. we set out. .The animals are active. .We spot'puku, bush buck, buffalo, wart hogs, and kudu. Even the stench of the Spoils of a lion kill is nearby. The driver stops close to a brush pile inan open field. We step out of the vehicle, . leaving the sense of security, be it false or not. I drink a beer from the cooler. I don’t pay 6 much attention to what they drink. We climb back in before the sun goes down any fiirther. Q: A 57 fi/Q/ (L! We drive on, leaving the field and we enter the overgrowth. We wzfie on it quick. (1“, (Flat...
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