PS40 week 3 - PS40 week 3 Elections Questions about US...

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PS40 week 3 07/08/2015 ° Elections: ° Questions about US elections the book attempts to address ° Who votes ° How do they vote ° Where do people vote Less crudely stated, what is the unit representation of the populace that people vote at and representative represent? Lets expand ° What does It take to win an election? More specifically they mean what id the vote threshold required for a candidate to be the winner Some discussion of campaign methods will be explored in greater detail in the congress and president sections ° ° Elections Is there an antecedent question to these that the book seems to ignore ° Why does anyone vote at all? If the probability of your one vote having an effect on the outcome on the election is effectively nothing, why vote at all? This becomes a collective action problem when we expand this individual logic out to the population of potential voters Why vote There have been instances where votes were both close enough and the importance of the election was great enough that it might undercut such an assertion of the pointlessness Presidential election 2000 If one ignores the vote of SCOTUS (7-2) as perhaps the deciding election to settle the 2000 election, it has been argued that Bush ultimately won Florida (and the electoral college) by about 500 votes
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Even then the probability of affecting the outcome with an individual vote is a fraction of a percentage point There may still be a logic to voting, but it relies more on an individual voter’s perception than perhaps the external validity of those perception Let: o U= an individual voter’s perceived utility of voting o A= the voter’s perceived ability to affect the outcome of an election {0%-100%, or 0.00-1.00 probability} considering that the actual probability of effecting the outcome is basically nothing, especially the higher the level of office sought by a candidate, why the heck would the voter believe otherwise?
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