4500_LabWriteUpFINAL

4500_LabWriteUpFINAL - MAE 4500 Manufacturing Methods Engine Lathe Project Group Members Mark Dalton Kyle Collier Nathan Jones Josh Smith-Moore

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Unformatted text preview: MAE 4500 Manufacturing Methods Engine Lathe Project Group Members Mark Dalton Kyle Collier Nathan Jones Josh Smith-Moore Michael Koch FS06 1 Table of Contents 1. Abstract 2. Introduction 3. Objectives 4. Experimental Set-Up and Procedure 5. Data and Results 6. Conclusion 7. References 8. Appendices A. Equipment B. Steel Chips formed at 1000 rpm C. Data Collected for Steel Specimens D. Data Collected for Aluminum Specimens E. Surface Roughness vs. Feed Rate for Each Tool Radius F. Surface Roughness vs. Feed Rate for Each Speed G. Unused Carbide Tools H. Used Carbide Tools I. Profilometer Readings 2 Abstract Turning samples on a lathe is a common practice in manufacturing processes. The resulting surface finish of the work piece determines the quality and functionality of the process; identifying the factors responsible for flaws in the surface finish is crucial to selecting the proper operating parameters needed to produce a final product that satisfies all quality specifications. In order to gather data for this analysis, turning operations have been performed on several samples of both steel and aluminum bar stock. The factors being examined include feed rate, tool radius and tool condition. The relationship of these factors was then examined with respect to the results and differences between actual and ideal surface roughness, chip thickness ratios, and tool wear. From the analysis, it is clear that all of these factors contribute to the surface roughness; to produce a finish as close to the ideal surface roughness as possible, a larger radius tool that is free of defects should be used along with a relatively low feed rate. 3 Introduction Machining is a process that creates a certain shape by removing material from a work piece. Often this process involves turning operations that utilizes a cutting tool to reduce the diameter of the work piece. The purpose of machining is to create certain geometric configurations and provide tighter tolerances of a work piece that is otherwise unobtainable by other material reduction techniques. An engine lathe is generally used in turning operations because it provides a rotational motion to the material being reduced, while a cutting tool is fed along the work material creating chips of the material. While this task of machining may appear trivial, the actual process is governed by many user-defined variables as well as variables that are defined by the machine itself. Variables that are to be defined by the user include the cutting speed, the feed rate of the cutting tool, the radius of the tool being used, as well as the tool type. The variables that one must account for that are intrinsic to the machine operation are chatter (vibration due to the machine), imprecision in the cutting tool being used, surface scratching due to the chip formations, the imprecision in the cutting tool itself, and the creation of built up edge (BUE), which concentrates along the face of the cutting tool. Altering any of these variables highly influences the resulting surface finish of the cutting tool....
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course MAE 4500 taught by Professor El-gizawy during the Fall '06 term at Missouri (Mizzou).

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4500_LabWriteUpFINAL - MAE 4500 Manufacturing Methods Engine Lathe Project Group Members Mark Dalton Kyle Collier Nathan Jones Josh Smith-Moore

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