8 April - • Both can be intentional • Both can be...

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Nonverbal Communication Touch o Study of haptics – what types of messages are construed o Low vs. high contact cultures – US is low contact o We use touch for Intimacy Greetings/salutations Hostility Knowledge/information acquisition Space o Study of proxemics o Study of strategic space Public zone (12 feet and above) Informal zone (4 feet – 12 feet) Casual zone (18 inches – 4 feet) – tone, body language change, volume lowers Intimate zone (0 inches – 18 inches) Similarities between Verbal and Nonverbal Communication Both are rule-governed Both are culturally bound
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Unformatted text preview: • Both can be intentional • Both can be unintentional Differences between Verbal and Nonverbal Communication • Nonverbal is a newer area of study • Nonverbal is not traditionally taught in school • Nonverbal has few overt rules or guides • Nonverbal has less individual control • Nonverbal is considered more private • Nonverbal is controlled by right hemisphere of the brain Relationship between Verbal and Nonverbal Communication • Redundancy • Substitution • Complementarity • Emphasis • Contradiction • Regulation...
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course COMMUNICAT 101 taught by Professor Lieberman during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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8 April - • Both can be intentional • Both can be...

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