Hunting of the Apes - became our common ancestors who lead...

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Michelle Praxmarer Craig B. Stanford: “The Hunting Apes” Craig B. Stanford states that meat eating may not merely have helped create a civilization. In “The Hunting Apes”, Stanford argues that it may have created humankind, in that the politics of meat (i.e., murdered animal) sharing may represent “the essential recipe for the expansion of the human brain.” He lucidly outlines the history of meat eating among the great apes, pointing out that, from the best available evidence, ancestral humans more actively hunted—and more eagerly consumed—meat than did any of the extant great apes. Humans had to hunt to survive and as their brains became more developed and advanced, their hunting skills became more strategic and skilled. He describes the distinctive social organization of each ape species and traces the biological history of humans. About six million years ago, chimpanzees and bonobos emerged and
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Unformatted text preview: became our common ancestors who lead to the evolution of our upright posture and, much later, our brains. He explains that this hypothesis replaces the previously prevailing notion that attributes our humanity to the mental abilities required for males to track down and slay prey. All in all, Stanford argues that meat eating was part of a fundamental behavioral and dietary shift in humans. Without it, our species may have not developed into what it is today. Those who control key resources control others who need it; Stanford explains that an important element of the evolution of patriarchal human societies has been the role of meat as such a controllable resource. What makes humans unique is meat. Humans’ desire for, the eating of, the hunting, and the sharing is all part of human culture; even since the very beginning....
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2008 for the course WRTG 1001 taught by Professor Hidekinakazano during the Spring '08 term at University of Colorado Denver.

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Hunting of the Apes - became our common ancestors who lead...

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