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02_10_activity_popa - Publishing Your Article Worksheet...

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Publishing Your Article Worksheet Step 1: Print your first draft, revised draft, and final draft. Step 2: Look at each paragraph across the three drafts. For example, look at your first paragraph in your first draft, your revised draft, and in your final draft. (hint: number the paragraphs on each draft) Step 3: Select the paragraph with the most revisions and edits between the first and final drafts. Step 4: Follow the instructions in the boxes below. Copy and paste paragraph from first draft. You may remove the yellow and green highlights if they are distracting to you during this comparison. In many cases people have fought their local governments about their second amendment rights saying their government couldn’t put restrictions on their right. Some of the cases argued were kept the same way they were when they started the cases and others were overturned and given the same conclusions. A good example of the conclusions being the same were the cases McDonald V. The City of Chicago and Sieyes V. The State of Washington. In the McDonald case a man was refused the right to own a handgun because the city had put a widespread ban on the purchase of handguns he was very unhappy because he felt the need to protect his home from the nearby gang activity. In the Sieyes V. State of Washington case a 17 year old boy was arrested and charged for unlawful possession of a handgun at the age of 17 he claimed that the incident violated his second amendment right to bear any arm. Both of these cases had someone arguing their second amendment right had been violated by the city or state. In the final conclusion of both of these cases they came to the same conclusion that the second
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  • Spring '13
  • davis
  • Supreme Court of the United States, First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, Second Amendment, unlawful possession

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