HOA - Project 2 Topics - Montgomery Bus Boycott: The...

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Montgomery Bus Boycott:The Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which African Americans refused to ridecity buses in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest segregated seating, took place fromDecember 5, 1955, to December 20, 1956, and is regarded as the first large-scaledemonstration against segregation in the U.S. Rosa Parks, an African-Americanwoman, refused to yield her seat to a white man on a Montgomery bus. She wasarrested and fined. The boycott of public buses by blacks in Montgomery began onthe day of Parks’ court hearing and lasted 381 days. Approximately 40,000African-American bus riders–the majority of the city’s black bus riders–boycottedthe system.Freedom Riders:On May 4, 1961, a group of 13 African-American and white civil rightsactivists launched the Freedom Rides, a series of bus trips through the AmericanSouth to protest segregation in interstate bus terminals.They departed fromWashington, D.C., and attempted to integrate facilities at bus terminals along theway into the Deep South. They would try to use the “white” bathrooms, and lunchcounters. They eventually made progress and desegregation began as hundreds offreedom riders appeared. During the 1947 action, African-American and white busriders tested the 1946 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Morgan v.Virginiathatsegregated bus seating was unconstitutional.March on Washington D.C.:On August 28, 1963, more than 200,000 Americans gathered in Washington,D.C., for a political rally known as the March on Washington for Jobs andFreedom. Organized by a number of civil rights and religious groups, the eventwas designed to shed light on the political and social challenges African Americanscontinued to face across the country. The march, which became a key moment inthe growing struggle for civil rights in the United States, culminated in MartinLuther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, a spirited call for racial justice andequality. Twice in American history, more than twenty years apart, a March onWashingtonwas planned, each intended to dramatize the right of black Americansto political and economic equality.
Selma March:In early 1965, Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Christian LeadershipConference (SCLC) made Selma, Alabama, the focus of its efforts to register blackvoters in the South. That March, protesters attempting to march from Selma to thestate capital of Montgomery were met with violent resistance by state and localauthorities. As the world watched, the protesters finally achieved their goal,walking around the clock for three days to reach Montgomery. The historic march,and King’s participation in it, greatly helped raise awareness of the difficulty facedby black voters in the South, and the need for a Voting Rights Act, passed later thatyear.

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Term
Spring
Professor
Mrs. Sweet
Tags
History, Civil Rights, Jim Crow Laws, Montgomery Bus Boycott, America, Project Topics, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr

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