Attaining Mastery

Attaining Mastery - Prepared for: Texas State University...

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Groundbreaking Press, Austin, TX – www.groundbreaking.com – © 2007, Brad Fregger Prepared for: Texas State University McCoy College of Business Administration Management 3303 – Spg. 2008 Attaining Mastery by Brad Fregger This paper covers the concept of Levels of Understanding Within the Learning Process . The objective is to provide a more complete understanding of these levels and their role in the Learning Process so that the learning facilitator (teacher, leader, mentor, etc.) can apply this knowledge as they attempt to move people from incompetence to Mastery . Many years ago, when I was beginning the Training & Development Department at Mervyn's Department Stores (Dayton-Hudson Corporation), I became aware of this concept; essentially it says that everyone goes through four basic levels of understanding whenever they learn a new skill, task, or activity. These levels are: 1) Unconsciously Incompetent (They don't know they don't know how to accomplish the skill, task, or activity.) 2) Consciously Incompetent (They know they don't know how to accomplish the skill, task, or activity.) 3) Consciously Competent (They know how, but need to concentrate to perform the skill, task, or activity.) 4) Subconsciously Competent (They know how to accomplish the skill, task or activity without thinking about it.) Let’s take learning to drive a car as an example; we could explain the process in this way: If you walked into a first grade class and said, "I have a problem. I have two cars here at school, and I need to get them both home. I can only drive one of the cars. Is there someone here who can drive my other car home for me?" You would probably get a few volunteers. Those who volunteered would most likely be unconsciously incompetent ; they don't know they don't know how to drive. Those that didn't raise their hands would probably be consciously incompetent ; they know they don't know how to drive. A few years later in driver’s training, you'd have a bunch of students who could drive, but had to concentrate on every step of the process to be sure they got it right; they are consciously competent . And, finally, there are those of us who get into the car after a day on the job and a half-hour later arrive home without any memory of the trip, let alone driving the car; we're subconsciously competent . Since this concept has been around for quite awhile, you’d think there’d be consensus on what it means. What I have discovered instead, is lots of confusion around this issue, as well as little understanding of its full significance. This paper was written to explain the levels of understanding in detail so those who find the concept valuable will be able to take full advantage of its potential. First, here’s a quick summary of how some others have interpreted this concept.
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Attaining Mastery - Prepared for: Texas State University...

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