ENZYME LAB - Determining the Properties of an Enzyme I....

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Determining the Properties of an Enzyme
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I. Abstract Enzymes are catalysts that help eukaryotic cells perform work. In the lab, an experiment using the enzyme peroxidase was done. It is a large protein commonly found in horseradish and turnips. Peroxidase converts harmful H 2 O 2 into H 2 O and O 2 . The oxygen that the peroxidase creates reacts with other compounds in the cell to form secondary products that are safe for the cell to use. II. Introduction Cells perform chemical reactions constantly, and, as said previously, are helped by protein-based catalysts called enzymes, which help the cell perform these reactions much faster. These enzymes have binding sites that allow only certain molecules, called substrates, to bind with them. These molecules form noncovalent bonds with the enzymes for a few milliseconds. This bond is called an enzyme-substrate complex. The molecules then leave the enzyme unchanged. The results of these bonds are called the products of the reactions. An enzyme can go through thousands of chemical reactions per second. How enzymes work: An enzyme must be able to work in decent conditions in order to be able to catalyze reactions. In the case where an enzyme is under stressful conditions, such as a
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high salt concentration, the substrate-binding site can alter it’s shape due to environmental changes, thus being ineffective in performing reactions. The most ideal conditions for an enzyme are between 0 and 40 degrees Celsius and a relatively neutral pH, or salt concentration. The peroxidase can be measured by following the formation of oxygen. Many dyes will react with oxygen by changing from colorless to a brownish color. Guaiacol was used to determine the amount of oxygen. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the absorbance of a colored enzyme-substrate-dye mix. The change in absorbance reflects the amount of enzyme activity. The enzyme activity was also determined through
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This note was uploaded on 05/01/2008 for the course BIO 131 taught by Professor Paz y mino during the Fall '08 term at UMass Dartmouth.

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ENZYME LAB - Determining the Properties of an Enzyme I....

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