Ch 18 - Chapter Eighteen Conquest and Survival: The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter Eighteen Conquest and Survival: The Trans-Mississippi West, 1860—1900
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Part One: Introduction
Background image of page 2
Conquest and Survival How does this painting illustrate the many facets of conquest and survival in the West?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter Focus Questions What was the impact of western expansion on Indian societies? How did new technologies and new industries help the development of the West as an “internal empire?” How were new communities created and old communities displaced? What was the myth and legend of the West?
Background image of page 4
Part Two: American Communities
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Oklahoma Land Rush Thousands gathered for the Oklahoma land rush. Land promised to Indians who had been forcibly relocated in the 1830s was first opened to white settlement in 1889. In a little over two months settlers filed 6000 homestead claims. The land rush symbolized the movement towards white settlement and the reconstruction of the West. This transformation came at the expense of Indian peoples.
Background image of page 6
Part Three: Indian Peoples under Siege
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Meeting of Europeans and Indians Indians had occupied the Plains for more than twenty thousand years developing diverse ways of adapting themselves to the environment. The Europeans brought disease and the need for Indians to adapt to European ways. The Plains Indians learned to ride horses and shoot guns.
Background image of page 8
Reservations and the Slaughter of the Buffalo Map: Major Indian Battles and Indian Reservations, p. 5 Legally, Indian tribes had been autonomous nations. The federal government had pressured Indian tribes to migrate west into a permanent Indian Territory. Whites’ desires for western land led the federal government to pressure western Indians on to moving to reservations. Farmers found that the reservation lands were inadequate for the subsistence farming. Nomadic tribes found their freedom curtailed and their buffalo destroyed both by the railroad and white hunting.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Indian Wars The discovery of gold and silver fueled wars. The Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho formed an alliance
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 35

Ch 18 - Chapter Eighteen Conquest and Survival: The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online