Ch 25 - Chapter Twenty-Five World War II, 1941-1945 Part...

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Chapter Twenty-Five World War II, 1941—1945
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Part One: Introduction
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World War II How does this painting reflect the American effort in World War II?
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Chapter Focus Questions What events led to Pearl Harbor and the declaration of war? How were national resources marshaled for war? What characterized American society during wartime? How were Americans mobilized into the armed forces? How was the war pursued in Europe and Asia? How did the atomic bomb affect diplomacy?
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Part Two: American Communities
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Los Alamos, New Mexico The Manhattan Project created a community of scientists whose mission was to build the atomic bomb. The scientists and their families lived in the remote, isolated community of Los Alamos. They formed a close-knit community, united by antagonism toward the army and secrecy from the outside world. Led by J. Robert Oppenheimer, the scientists developed a strong sense of camaraderie as they struggled to develop the atomic bomb.
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Part Three: The Coming of World War II
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The Shadows of War The global character of the Great Depression accelerated a breakdown in the political order. Militaristic authoritarian regimes that had emerged in Japan, Italy, and Germany threatened peace throughout the world. Japan took over Manchuria and then invaded China. Italy made Ethiopia a colony. German aggression against Czechoslovakia threatened to force Britain and France into the war.
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American Opinion on the European War Media: Gallup Polls, p. 773
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Isolationism By the mid-1930s many Americans had concluded that entry into WWI and an active foreign role for the United States had been a serious mistake. College students protested against the war. Congress passed the Neutrality Acts to limit the sale of munitions to warring countries. Prominent Americans urged a policy of “America First” to promote non-intervention. FDR promoted military preparedness, despite little national support.
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Response The combined German-Soviet invasion of Poland plunged Europe into war. German blitzkrieg techniques quickly led to takeovers of Denmark, Norway, and later Belgium and France. As the Nazi air force pounded Britain, FDR pushed for increased military expenditures. Since 1940 was an election year, FDR claimed these were for “hemispheric defense.” After winning his third term, FDR expanded American involvement. FDR met with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill
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Ch 25 - Chapter Twenty-Five World War II, 1941-1945 Part...

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