Ch 23 - Chapter Twenty-Three The Twenties, 1920-1929 Part...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter Twenty-Three The Twenties, 1920—1929
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Part One: Introduction
Background image of page 2
The Twenties What themes of the twenties are shown by this painting?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter Focus Questions How did the second industrial revolution transform the economy? What were the promise and limits of prosperity in the 1920s? What were the new mass media and the culture of consumption? How did the Republican Party dominate politics in the twenties? What were the political and cultural opposition to modern trends?
Background image of page 4
Part Two: American Communities
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Movie Audience and Hollywood In the 1920s, the movies were American’s most popular form of the new mass culture. A huge, national audience regularly attended movies in grand, majestic theaters. The production center for this dream world was Hollywood, California. A frontier boom town, dominated by the movie stars who lived opulent lives, Hollywood symbolized Americans’ dreams of freedom, material success, and the chance to remake one’s very identity.
Background image of page 6
Part Three: Postwar Prosperity and Its Price
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Second Industrial Revolution The economy underwent a transformation during the 1920s as a second industrial revolution took hold. Driven by electricity and automated machinery, industry concentrated on producing consumer goods. A housing boom further drove the economy.
Background image of page 8
The Modern Corporation A managerial revolution stressed scientific management and behavioral psychology. Successful corporations worked to: integrate production and distribution diversify products expand industrial research gain control of entire industries Increasingly, a class of salaried executives rather than stockholders made corporate policy.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Welfare Capitalism To improve worker morale and reduce the challenge of unions, corporations employed “welfare capitalism.” To undercut unions, businesses promoted an “open shop” in which non-union workers received the same benefits as union workers. Union membership rapidly declined. The AFL showed no interest in organizing workers in the new industries. The courts also adopted a pro-business stance.
Background image of page 10
The Auto Age The car symbolized the rise of the consumer economy. By 1925, the assembly line at Henry Ford’s Highland Park plant completed a car every 10 seconds. Ford paid his workers more than the going rate, reducing turnover while enabling them to be both producers and consumers of his Model T. The car cost $300 - three month’s wages. The auto industry spurred production of steel, rubber, glass, and petroleum. Road building triggered commercial development along highways, promoting new businesses and changed social habits.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The automobile enabled people to move into suburbs. Cities also grew at a fast pace, not only
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 41

Ch 23 - Chapter Twenty-Three The Twenties, 1920-1929 Part...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online