AASP 202 Film Review - Candace Hood-Bey UID 114503985 Black...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Candace Hood-Bey UID: 114503985 Black Culture in the United States AASP 202 Section 401
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Claudine, a film produced and distributed in the 1970s tells a story of a single black mother living on welfare with six children who finds love with a local garbage collector. Claudine is a thought provoking film that illustrates the hardships of maintaining a black family unit in the welfare state. The film explores the myriad of social ills and provides a critical view of the impact of the welfare system on black single mothers, black men and the family unit. The black family unit is not intact, the black family unit in America has a history of disruption dating back to slavery; a disproportionate number of black children are born to single mothers, this is a largely low-income disproportionately black phenomenon. The cycle of poverty is a relentlessly bleak reality that offers few opportunities for escape; it’s a cycle of entrenched multigenerational poverty. Being black in America is a salient signal and predictor of one’s future; black bodies are constantly marginalized and discriminated against. Our futures can often be predicted by our race and background. The circumstances the underclass must endure is perpetual inequity and the systems set in place to “fix” these problems are broken. In this paper, I will argue that the welfare states contributed to the disruption of the black family. Throughout this paper I will examine various themes expressed in Claudine. I will discuss the relationship between poverty and single parent households, the intentions of the welfare system and the unfair consequences of the system as well as the criminalization of poverty. Additionally I will discuss the theme of marriage and welfare and the implications it had in encouraging single black female headship. I will also touch on the plight of the black man and that role in female headship. Next, I will discuss how the dependency on welfare caused female headship
Image of page 2
and lastly, I will discuss how welfare dependency and the creation and expansion of the welfare state hindered black progress. The relation between poverty and single parent families is very evident. America’s discussion about black poverty was evoked as a result of the nation’s concern for addressing poverty as a whole. The formation of the United States’ welfare state was a product of class struggles organized around race and gender. The national welfare
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern