Ch 28 - Chapter Twenty-Eight The Civil Rights Movement,...

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Chapter Twenty-Eight The Civil Rights Movement, 1945 —1966
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Part One: Introduction
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The Civil Rights Movement, 1945- 1966 What does this painting suggest about the nature of the civil rights movement?
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Chapter Focus Questions What were the legal and political origins of the African American civil rights struggle? What characterized Martin Luther King’s rise to leadership? How did student protesters take direct action in the South? How did civil rights affect national politics? What were the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965? How did America’s other minorities pursue their civil rights?
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Part Two: American Communities
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The Montgomery Bus Boycott In 1955 Montgomery’s black community mobilized when Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat and comply with segregation laws. Led by Martin Luther King, Jr., a Baptist minister, a boycott of busses was launched. A network of local activists organized car pools using private cars to get people to and from work. Leaders endured violence and legal harassment, but won a court ruling that the segregation ordinance was unconstitutional.
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Part Three: Origins of the Movement
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Civil Rights After World War II The WWII experiences of African Americans laid the foundations for the subsequent struggle. A mass migration to the North brought political power to African Americans working through the Democratic Party. The NAACP grew in numbers and its Legal Defense Fund initiated a series of lawsuits to win key rights. Key ways the African Americans were breaking color barriers included: Jackie Robinson’s entrance into major league baseball Ralph Bunche’s winning a Nobel Peace prize A new generation of jazz musicians created be-bop.
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The Segregated South In the South, segregation and unequal rights were still the law of the land. Law and custom kept blacks as second-class citizens with no effective political rights. African Americans had learned to survive and not challenge the situation.
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The NAACP initiated a series of court cases challenging the constitutionality of segregation. In Brown v. Board of Education , newly appointed Chief Justice Earl Warren led the court to declare that separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. The court postponed ordering a clear timetable
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This note was uploaded on 05/01/2008 for the course AMH 2020 taught by Professor Michelleadams during the Spring '06 term at University of Central Florida.

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Ch 28 - Chapter Twenty-Eight The Civil Rights Movement,...

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