Ch 27 - Chapter Twenty-Seven America at MidCentury, 1952-...

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Chapter Twenty-Seven America at Mid- Century, 1952— 1963
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Part One: Introduction
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America at Midcentury What does this photo indicate about American families at midcentury? Who is missing from this photo?
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Chapter Focus Questions What characterized post-World War II prosperity? What was the ideal of suburban life? What was the reality? What characterized the emergence of youth culture? What were the criticisms of television and mass culture? What characterized foreign policy in the Eisenhower years? Who was John F. Kennedy and what was the promise of a New Frontier?
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Part Two: American Communities
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Popular Music in Memphis Memphis was a rapidly growing segregated city with whites and blacks of various classes. Elvis Presley listened to both “white” and “black” music. Sam Phillips, a white producer, recognized that Elvis could sing with the emotional intensity and power of black performers. Elvis blended black styles of music with white styles to help create a new style of music. Rock n’ roll united teenagers and gave them the feeling that it was their music (and misunderstood by adults).
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Part Three: American Society at Midcentury
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The Eisenhower Presidency President Dwight D. Eisenhower inspired confidence and adopted a middle-of-the-road style. He ran the government in a businesslike, cooperative manner, pursuing policies that helped private companies and allowing practices that harmed on the environment. He also rejected calls from conservatives to dismantle the welfare state. Although his presidency included two brief recessions, he presided over an extensive increase in real wages.
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Subsidizing Prosperity The federal government helped subsidize this prosperity by providing loans for homes and assisting the growth of suburbs. One of the first planned communities was built by William Levitt and encompassed 17,000 homes, without a single African American resident. The federal government: paid for veterans’ college education built an interstate highway system following the Russian launch of a satellite spent millions on education.
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Suburban Life Suburban life: strengthened the domestic ideal provided a model of the efficient, patient suburban wife for television Suburban growth corresponded with an increase in church attendance . Popular religious figures stressed the importance of fitting in.
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California and Suburban Life California came to embody postwar suburban life, with the cars connecting its components.
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Organized Labor and the AFL-CIO In the mid-1950s, trade unions reached a peak of membership and influence, especially in the Democratic Party. The merger of the AFL and the CIO marked the
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Ch 27 - Chapter Twenty-Seven America at MidCentury, 1952-...

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