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Ch 29 - Chapter Twenty-Nine War at Home War Abroad...

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Chapter Twenty-Nine War at Home, War Abroad, 1965—1974
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Part One: Introduction
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War Abroad, War at Home, 1965- 1974 How is the nature of the period from 1965- 1974 captured in this painting?
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Chapter Focus Questions How and why was U.S. involvement in the war in Vietnam widened? What was the “sixties generation” and what was its role in the antiwar movement? How did poverty contribute to the urban crisis? What characterized the election of 1968? What contributed to the rise of “liberation” movements? What characterized the Nixon presidency and how did the Watergate conspiracy arise?
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Part Two: American Communities
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Uptown, Chicago, Illinois In 1964, a small group of college students tried to help residents in a poor Chicago neighborhood. The activists were members of Students for a Democratic Society. Founded by white college students, SDS initially sought reform and grew by 1968 to have 350 chapters and between 60 and 100,000 members. Efforts to mobilize the urban poor were unsuccessful, but SDS members helped break down isolation and strengthened community ties. By 1967, SDS energies were being directed into protests against the widening war in Vietnam.
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Part Three: Vietnam: America’s Longest War
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Johnson’s War Although pledging not to send American soldiers into combat, he manipulated Congress into passing a resolution that was tantamount to a declaration of war. When bombing failed to halt North Vietnamese advances, Johnson sent large numbers of troops into Vietnam to prevent a Communist victory. Search-and-destroy missions combined with chemical warfare wreaked havoc on the people and the land. LBJ was committed to a war of attrition to wear out and destroy Vietnam.
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The Credibility Gap Johnson kept his decisions from the American public and distorted accounts of military actions. News media increasingly questioned the official descriptions of the war. As casualties mounted, more Americans questions LBJ’s handling of the war. In Congress, Democratic senators led by J, William Fulbright opposed Johnson's handling of the conflict.
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Part Four: A Generation in Conflict
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“The Times They Are A-Changin’” People of all ages protested against the war, but young people stood out. Early campus protests at Berkeley centered on students’ rights to free speech. Many felt that the university had become a faceless bureaucratic machine.
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