Ch 22 - Chapter Twenty-Two World War I, 1914-1920 Part One:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter Twenty-Two World War I, 1914—1920
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Part One: Introduction
Background image of page 2
World War I How does this painting reflect American opinion on World War I?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter Focus Questions How did America’s international role expand? How did the United States move from neutrality to participation in the Great War? How did the United States mobilize the society and the economy for war? How did Americans express dissent and how was it repressed? Why did Woodrow Wilson fail to win the peace?
Background image of page 4
Part Two: American Communities
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Vigilante Justice in Bisbee, Arizona In 1917 armed men began rounding up strikers at a copper mine in Bisbee, Arizona. Of the 2,000 men kept under armed guard, 1,400 refused to return to work and were taken on a freight train to a small town in the desert. The radical Industrial Workers of the World (“Wobblies”) had organized a peaceful strike that won support from over half the town’s miners. The sheriff and town’s businessmen justified vigilantism by invoking patriotism and racial purity. Neither the federal nor the state government would act. The Arizona mines operated without unions into the 1930s and with very few immigrant workers.
Background image of page 6
Part Three: Becoming a New World Power
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Roosevelt: The Big Stick Americans believed that they had a God-given role to promote a moral world order. Theodore Roosevelt’s “big stick” approach called for intervention. He secured a zone in Panama for a canal, completed in 1914. He expanded the Monroe Doctrine to justify armed intervention in the Caribbean where the United States assumed management of several nations’ finances. In Asia, the United States pursued the “Open Door” policy. TR mediated a settlement of the Russo-Japanese War.
Background image of page 8
Taft: Dollar Diplomacy Map: The U. S. in the Caribbean, p. 670 His successor, William Howard Taft, favored “dollar diplomacy” that substituted investment for military intervention. American investment in Central America doubled. Military interventions occurred in Honduras and Nicaragua. In Asia, the quest for greater trade led to worsening relations with Japan over the issue ownership of Chinese railroads.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mexico Woodrow Wilson had no diplomatic experience before becoming president. He favored expanding the Open Door principle of equal access to markets. He saw expansion of American capitalism in moral terms. The complex realities of power politics interfered with his moral vision. Unable to control the revolution in Mexico, Wilson sent troops to Vera Cruz and northern Mexico. When relations with Germany worsened, Wilson accepted an international commission’s recommendation and withdrew U.S. troops from Mexico.
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 42

Ch 22 - Chapter Twenty-Two World War I, 1914-1920 Part One:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online