Ch 26 - Chapter Twenty-Six The Cold War, 1945-1952 Part...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter Twenty-Six The Cold War, 1945—1952
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Part One: Introduction
Background image of page 2
The Cold War What does this poster indicate about the Cold War?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter Focus Questions What were the prospects for world peace at the end of World War II? What as the diplomatic policy during the Cold War? What characterized the Truman presidency? What led to Anti-communism and McCarthyism? What characterized Cold War culture and society? What were the causes, battles, and results of the Korean War?
Background image of page 4
Part Two: American Communities
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
University of Washington, Seattle In 1948 philosophy professor Melvin Rader was falsely accused of being a Communist conspirator. During the cold war era, the federal government was providing substantial support for higher education through the GI Bill. The student population at the University of Washington grew rapidly and a strong sense of community among the students grew, led by older, former soldiers. The Cold War put a damper on this community. Wild charges of communist subversion led several states to require state employees to take loyalty oaths. In this repressed atmosphere, faculty were dismissed, students dropped out of school, and the free speech was restrained on the campuses.
Background image of page 6
Part Three: Global Insecurities at War’s End
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Financing the Future During WWII, the United States and Soviet Union had temporarily put aside their differences in a common fight. Divergent interests made a continued alliance unlikely. Fears of the return of depression led the United States to take a much more active international stance. The Soviet Union interpreted the aggressive American economic moves as a threat.
Background image of page 8
The Division of Europe Map: Divided Europe, p.815 FDR’s realism allowed him to recognize that some kinds of spheres of influence were inevitable for the winning powers.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Part Four: The Policy of Containment
Background image of page 10
The Truman Doctrine While FDR favored diplomacy and compromise, Truman was committed to a get-tough policy with the Soviets. When civil war threatened the governments in Turkey and Greece, the United States warned of a communist coup and provided $400 million to defeat the rebels. The Truman Doctrine committed the United States to a policy of trying to contain Communism.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cold War Policies Media: Overview: Major Cold War Policies
Background image of page 12
The Marshall Plan and the Berlin Crisis The Marshall Plan provided $13 billion to rebuild Europe. The plan had the long-term impact of revitalizing the European capitalist economy and driving a further wedge between the West and Soviet Union. The gap widened when the western zones of
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 40

Ch 26 - Chapter Twenty-Six The Cold War, 1945-1952 Part...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online