Romantic era - Intro to Dance The Romantic Era(early to mid...

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Intro. to Dance The Romantic Era (early to mid 1800’s): In this era we see Ballet emerging as an art form. The audience (audience/performer) requires content, which needs to be religiously acceptable. Female characters inspired a certain type of recognizable, romantic heroine-a sylph-like fairy whose pristine goodness and purity inevitably triumphs over evil or injustice. The complexity of technique and partnering continues to increase (this is a significant difference between the earlier eras of dance partnering), costumes begin to shorten to show the line of the leg. Romantic ballets focused on man, nature, society and the supernatural. Romantic ballets were often set in two acts (or more): the first representing daylight and civilization, the second taking place at night in the spiritual realm, and frequently ending in tragedy, exaggerating consequence. The two narrative ballets that survived from this era are La Sylphide (1832) and Giselle (1841). Marie Taglioni, trained by her father, dance master, Filippo Taglioni, is a ballerina that is closely associated with the romantic era of ballet. She was known for mastery of difficult technical movements coupled with a performance with great ease and grace. She is also the ballerina that popularized the use of pointe shoes to aid in the appearance of a light, floating quality.
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