150F2014 - GHIST 150 Professor H Gelfand Cross-Cultural Exchanges in Recent Global History Fall Semester 2014 Mondays Wednesdays\/Fridays 11:1512:05 2036

150F2014 - GHIST 150 Professor H Gelfand Cross-Cultural...

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GHIST 150 Professor H. Gelfand Cross-Cultural Exchanges in Recent Global History Fall Semester 2014 Mondays/ Wednesdays/Fridays, 11:15- 12:05 2036 Duke Office: 211 Maury Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Tuesdays, 1:50-3:50, and by appointment Telephone: 540.568.4765 (during office hours only) Overview: This course is an overview of major topics in the global community since 1900 as seen through the lens of journeys and cross-cultural exchanges. Our seminar format will allow us to discuss and debate issues, authors’ interpretations, the means by which historians gather and analyze facts, the means by which academics in fields other than history contribute to our understanding of the past, and what greater truths we can derive about the human condition and the human experience. Our readings include books, letters and journal entries, scholarly articles, radio and television interviews, courtroom testimonies, speeches and addresses, films, journalistic pieces, television documentaries, autobiographical pieces, book reviews, photographs, film reviews, and federal agency and international agency internet sites. This will allow us not only to consider the information contained therein, but also to assess the values, uses, and shortcomings of these different types of mediums and sources. Although it is impossible to cover every culture and every issue, we will explore peoples and cultures in North America, South America, Africa, Asia, Australia and Oceania, and Europe. Our readings cover the topics of theories of: history, culture, and travel; anthropological studies of pre-literate societies; refugees; the relationship of humans to the natural world; genocide; communicable disease; art and the meaning of its various forms; tourism and ecotourism; nuclear weapons; food; mountain climbing and trekking; dancing and music; and theology. These topics, however, will permit us to explore much broader and diverse issues: nationalism; philosophy and religion; diversity or uniformity of cultures and nationalities; openness to other cultures and prejudice; forced migration; economically-induced migration; border issues; animals and efforts to save them and their habitats; climate change- induced migration; post-colonial assistance to native peoples; cultural identity of native peoples; organized mass murder; global and local-scale conflicts and wars; scientific and medical development; disease prevention and responsible sexual behavior; global environmental change; water resources; pollution; human overpopulation; poverty; tourism and sustenance of native peoples; war memorials and national identities; sports and athletics; radicalism and challenges to political and economic systems; effects of nuclear weapons; social and political issues in popular cinema; attempts at de-nuclearization and anti-war efforts; food as cultural exchange; availability of food and starvation; music and dance as cultural exchanges and cultural influences; and ideas on human cooperation and peace.
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