PHI 1175 BB-1 - HUME'S PROJECT: EMPIRICISM AND HUMAN NATURE...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
HUME’S PROJECT: EMPIRICISM AND HUMAN NATURE Philosophers want to know what sort of thing morality is. Can moral judgments  be true and justified, and therefore constitute knowledge? Can we get to know what, if  anything, “morally right” conduct is? If so, how? Let us clarify two notions at the outset: the notion of “belief” and that of  “knowledge”. A belief is a judgment that is taken to be true. As for “knowledge”, it is constituted by judgments that are both true and justified.  “Justified” contrasts with “unjustified”. Synonymous expressions (synonymous contrasts)  include “warranted/unwarranted”, and “reasonable/unreasonable”. Different philosophers  and schools of thought may invest each expression with specific connotations, but these  need not concern us here. Now, I want to present a certain “traditional” view of mind, knowledge, and  morality. Many elements of this traditional view go back to the Greeks, notably Plato and  Aristotle, and were integrated to catholic philosophy and the doctrine of the catholic  Church, which prevailed throughout the Middle Ages.  Early modern philosophy,  although it profundly differed from mediaval catholic philosophy, preserved much of this  “traditional view” According to the traditional view in question, the human mind includes the two  following components: “reason”, and “passions”. Reason  is a faculty that can issue (or “generate”) judgments, and assess  judgments in general, in terms of true/false, justified/unjustified,  reasonable/unreasonable, etc.  Judgments can bear on two domains. In other words, there are two kinds of  objects about which reason can acquire knowledge. On the one hand, there is the domain of the “external world”, i.e. this world  outside my consciousness, which I experience as my environment. Acquiring knowledge  about the external world poses certain problems. There are reasons for that, the two  following being particularly important. First, getting to know the external world involves the delivery, “inside” my  consciousness, of representations coming from my five senses. These inner, mental  1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
representations are the content of my consciousness, and the material from which reason  constructs judgments about the external world. Unfortunately, my senses are fallible.  Therefore, the testimony of the senses is not entirely reliable, and may induce various  distorsions in the representation of the world.  Second, the external world itself seems to be changing, in certain regards.  
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 17

PHI 1175 BB-1 - HUME'S PROJECT: EMPIRICISM AND HUMAN NATURE...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online