Final Study Guide

Final Study Guide - Chapter 11-Objectives and Appeals 11.1....

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Chapter 11-Objectives and Appeals 11.1. Objectives and method appeals (lecture and textbook, especially focus on how the appeals are used. Understanding the 10 objectives and appropriate methods are a must. See the table for more help) Be sure that you know the practical tips and applications provided for many of the strategies. OBJECTIVE: What the advertiser hopes to achieve Method: How the Advertiser Plans to Achieve the Objective Promote brand recall: recall its brand name first; that is before any of the competitors brand names Repetition Slogans and Jingles Link a key attribute to the brand name: associate a key attribute with a brand name and vice versa Unique Selling Proposition Persuade the Consumer: high- engagement arguments Reasons-why ads Hard-sell ads Comparison ads Testimonials Demonstration Advertorials Infomercials Instill brand preference: like or prefer its brand above all others Feel-good ads Humor ads Sexual appeal ads Scare the consumer into action: instilling fear Fear-appeal ads Change behavior by inducing anxiety: playing to their anxieties; often the social in nature Anxiety ads Social anxiety ads Transform consumption Experiences: To create feeling, image or mood about a brand that is activated when the consumer uses the product or service. Transformational ads Situate the brand socially: give the Slice-of-life ads
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brand a meaning by placing it in a desirable social context Product placement/short internet films Light-fantasy ads Define the brand image: To create an image for a brand by relying predominantly on visuals rather than words and arguments Image ads Strategic Implications: Slogan and Jingles - Extremely resistant - Efficient for consumer - Big carryover. - Long-term commitment/initial expense - Competitive interference - Creative resistance USP - Very resistant - Big carryover - Long-term commitment - Expense - Competitive interference - Some creative resistance Reason-Why Ads - Gives consumer permission to buy - Gives consumer a socially acceptable defense in buying - Assumes high level of involvement, consumers have to pay attention - Generates counterarguments, may convince consumers why NOT to buy - Legal/regulatory challenges, make sure your reasons are legit. Hard-Sell approach - Gives consumers permission to buy NOW - Gives the consumer a socially acceptable defense in making a potentially poor choice (had to act! sale was one day!) - Legal/regulatory challenges Comparison Ads - Can help low share brand through awareness - Provides social justification for purchase - Significant legal exposure
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- Not done outside US - Not for established market leaders - These ads are sometimes evaluated as more offensive and less interesting Testimonial Advertising - Very popular people can generate popularity for the brand - Can make more attribute-related reasons important (if it’s not good for MJ its not good for me) - Generally poor memorability for who is promoting what. -
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2008 for the course JOUR 4200 taught by Professor Frisby during the Spring '08 term at Missouri (Mizzou).

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Final Study Guide - Chapter 11-Objectives and Appeals 11.1....

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