HIST 2111- FINAL EXAM STUDY GUIDE

HIST 2111- FINAL EXAM STUDY GUIDE - HIST 2111: Exam #3...

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HIST 2111: Exam #3 Study Guide (Chapters 11–15) Chapter 11 1. How was the growth of cotton as the major crop for the South enhanced? The growth of cotton was enhanced with the invention of the cotton gin. Short-staple cotton, though hardier and a coarser strain, was harder to process than long-staple cotton. Because of the invention of the cotton gin, it was easier to process cotton, especially since the demand for cotton was high due to the growth of the textile industry. By 1850, the South was producing 3 million bales a year and 5 million by 1860. 2. What allowed its cultivation to expand to a much broader geographical area? Ambitious men and women who moved into previously uncultivated land to establish new cotton-growing regions are what allowed cotton cultivation to expand to a much broader geographical area, such as Alabama and Louisiana. 3. Describe the various reasons that the South did little to create a flourishing commercial or industrial economy as in the North. The South did little to create a flourishing commercial or industrial economy as in the North because: 1) of the great profitability of the agricultural system. 2) wealthy southerners who had so much capital in their land and slaves that there was little left for other investments. 3) the long, hot, steamy summers were less suitable for industrial development than the climate of the North and 4) the set of values distinctive to the South that discouraged the growth of cities and industry. 4. Approximately what percentage of white Southerners were members of slave- owning families? About 25% or less or white Southerners were members of slave-owning families. Even with all members of slave-owning families included, those owning slaves still amounted to perhaps no more than one-quarter of the white population. 5. How did women of the North and South compare with respect to birth rates, education, and economic opportunities? When it comes to education, southern white women had less access to education than their northern counterparts did. For birth rates, the white southern birth rate remained nearly 20% higher than that of the whole nation. As far as economic opportunities go, living on farms of modest size meant a fuller engagement in the economic life for many women 6. Describe the characteristics of small farmers in the South with respect to ownership of slaves, relationship to slaves, access to education, prospects for social mobility, and relationship to the plantation system. Small farmers in the South or “plain folk” as they were called, owned a few slaves with whom they worked and lived with far more closely than larger planters. Most plain folk who owned land devoted themselves largely to subsistence farming while others grew cotton or other crops, although they usually could not produce enough to be able to expand or get out of debt. Most of them knew that they had little potential of bettering their fate and one reason was because of the southern educational system which provided ample opportunities to gain an education, but were only in the reach of the upper class.
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2008 for the course HIST 2111 taught by Professor Randolph,terry during the Spring '08 term at University of West Georgia.

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HIST 2111- FINAL EXAM STUDY GUIDE - HIST 2111: Exam #3...

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