lecture_notes_14_(ta)

lecture_notes_14_(ta) - Lecture 14 Higher Brain Functions I...

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Lecture 14: Higher Brain Functions I - Cortical Higher Brain Functions Neuronal functions that are not directly associated with sensory, motor and autonomic activities are often referred to as higher cognitive functions of the brain. Examples include emotion and motivation, attention and planning, speech production and comprehension, learning and memory and many others. The regions of the brain that initiate and control these functions are distinct from, but interact with, those that directly control sensory, motor and autonomic functions. The majority of these regions are thought to be located in the cerebral cortex (Figure 5-11) , but many subcortical regions also play an important role in various cognitive functions (Figures 5-17,5-20) . The evidence supporting these conclusions comes largely from brain damaged patients in which specific psychological deficits are associated with damage to certain regions of the brain. Higher Order Sensory and Motor Areas of the Cortex - These are areas of the cerebral cortex that provide input to motor areas or receive and integrate output from sensory areas. Posterior Parietal Cortex
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lecture_notes_14_(ta) - Lecture 14 Higher Brain Functions I...

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