Study #2

Study#2 - -Uranium is a much more fissionable isotope The actual bomb was a simpler design than its counterpart Richard Feyman was responsible for

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-Uranium is a much more fissionable isotope. The actual bomb was a simpler design than its counterpart. Richard Feyman was responsible for calculating the amount of uranium needed to achieve critical mass . - Critical mass is the amount of uranium needed to start the chain reaction. However, if you have more than the required mass to start the reaction, the reaction would take place faster and grow exponentially. - Feyman calculated about 50 kilograms (110 lb.) of pure uranium. However, the uranium obtained was seldom pure, so a large amount would be needed. -Robert Oppenheimer said that the required supercritical mass would be about 100 kilograms ( 220 lb.). - Uranium resources were very rare so the bomb would have to be simple and guaranteed to work. The luxury of a test model would not be available. -Because uranium is more fissionable, the bomb would be based on a gun-type detonator. Basically, a section of uranium would be shaped with a center section missing. -The center section, a perfect fit, would be place away from the large uranium mass. A conventional explosive would be used to propel the center section into the large section.
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2008 for the course ECON 161 taught by Professor Yuichikitamura during the Spring '07 term at Yale.

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Study#2 - -Uranium is a much more fissionable isotope The actual bomb was a simpler design than its counterpart Richard Feyman was responsible for

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