CMOS PROCESS - 2.2TheCMOSProcess Figure2..,Si...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 9 pages.

2.2 The CMOS Process Figure 2.6 outlines the steps to create an integrated circuit. The starting material is silicon, Si, refined from quartzite (with less than 1 impurity in 10  10  silicon atoms). We draw a single- crystal silicon  boule  (or ingot) from a crucible containing a melt at approximately 1500  ° (the melting point of silicon at 1 atm. pressure is 1414  ° C). This method is known as  Czochralski growth. Acceptor ( p -type) or donor ( n -type) dopants may be introduced into  the melt to alter the type of silicon grown. The boule is sawn to form thin circular wafers (6, 8, or 12 inches in diameter, and  typically 600   m thick), and a flat is ground (the primary flat), perpendicular to the <110>  crystal axis—as a “this edge down” indication. The boule is drawn so that the wafer surface  is either in the (111) or (100) crystal planes. A smaller secondary flat indicates the wafer  crystalline orientation and doping type. A typical submicron CMOS processes uses p -type  (100) wafers with a resistivity of approximately 10   cm—this type of wafer has two flats,  90 °  apart. Wafers are made by chemical companies and sold to the IC manufacturers. A  blank 8-inch wafer costs about $100. To begin IC fabrication we place a batch of wafers (a  wafer lot  ) on a  boat  and grow a  layer (typically a few thousand angstroms) of  silicon dioxide  , SiO  2  , using a furnace. Silicon is used in the semiconductor industry not so much for the properties of silicon, but because of the physical, chemical, and electrical properties of its native oxide, SiO  2  . An IC  fabrication  process  contains a series of masking steps (that in turn contain other steps) to  create the layers that define the transistors and metal interconnect.   FIGURE 2.6 IC fabrication. Grow crystalline silicon (1); make a wafer (2– 3); grow a silicon dioxide (oxide) layer in a furnace (4); apply liquid  photoresist (resist) (5); mask exposure (6); a cross-section through a  wafer showing the developed resist (7); etch the oxide layer (8); ion  implantation (9–10); strip the resist (11); strip the oxide (12). Steps  similar to 4–12 are repeated for each layer (typically 12–20 times for a  CMOS process). Each masking step starts by spinning a thin layer (approximately 1   m) of liquid  photoresist (  resist  ) onto each wafer. The wafers are baked at about 100  ° C to remove the 
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

solvent and harden the resist before being exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light (typically less  than 200 nm wavelength) through a  mask  . The UV light alters the structure of the resist,  allowing it to be removed by developing. The exposed oxide may then be 
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
  • Fall '15
  • prasad
  • Electrical resistance, mask, CMOS process

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern