Demo Lab 3 - 3. 2.46%=(.162watts/6.6watts) x 100 4. When...

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Demo Lab 3 Katie Bredice Wednesday Section Henry Wen Tunable Dye Laser 7 November 2007
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In this lab we demonstrated a tunable dye laser. An argon ion laser pumps a flowing dye solution of Rhodamine 590 and an intracavity prism is used for wavelength selectivity. The light is positioned at Brewster’s angle. We measured the power with an oscilloscope. This lab showed that by changing the orientation of the mirror resulted in a reflection of different wavelengths (color). In this lab we had Peak power of 310mW that fell to 200mW at the beginning. This error could have occurred from a malfunction in the oscilloscope. 1. See attached sheet 2. The dye laser beam is easier to see inside the laser cavity because it is a lot more powerful. Most of the light is reflected back; only about 5 percent is passed through.
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Unformatted text preview: 3. 2.46%=(.162watts/6.6watts) x 100 4. When the electrons in the dye are excited, they only emit in certain wavelengths. We know its not the mirrors because we reach a point where the light is in the visible range, and therefore the mirror should reflect it, but it isnt amplified. The dye emits several wavelengths but only certain ones can be amplified. 5. The bright yellow light that we see around the dye jet is spontaneous emission. We blocked/took away the stimulated emission so its all spontaneously emitting so it is brighter. Output Power Versus Wavelength 120 130 150 160 162 20 60 90 160 159 152 146 138 138 131 100 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Micrometer Yellow Green Orange...
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Demo Lab 3 - 3. 2.46%=(.162watts/6.6watts) x 100 4. When...

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