Material Science Test 3 Study Guide

Material Science Test 3 Study Guide - Material Science Test...

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Material Science Test 3 Study Guide Composite Materials Define a composite and classify composites based on the geometry of reinforcing phase Composite Materials which are composed of two components Reinforcing Phase Matrix Phase Geometry of the reinforcing phase Unidirectional Fiber Reinforcing Composites Anisotropic (properties differ depending on direction) Fibers are strong in fiber direction Fibers are weak in perpendicular direction Particle Reinforcing Composites Isotropic (properties are the same in any direction) Concrete Particles are spherical and are mixed randomly, all directions are equivalent Describe the main characteristics that fibers and matrixes must have to show reinforcement properties Fibers High strength High elastic modulus Low density
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Strong and stable interface with the matrix Matrix Provides lateral support for the fibers and load transfer Toughness Describe the types of mechanical and chemical bonding that occur at the fiber/matrix interface Mechanical Bond When we process composites, there is a change in temperature when heating and cooling the composite. This change in temperature will cause friction and/or compression forces at the interface forming a “mechanical bond” Chemical Bonds Secondary Bonds Hydrogen bonding Van der Waals Caused from wetting properties of the fiber Primary Bonds Strongest bond that forms at the fiber-matrix interface Diffusion of atoms drive the formation of the interface Briefly describe the classification of composites based on their matrix types Metal Matrix Composites (MMC’s) High temperature resistance High shear strength
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High compressive strength Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC’s) Lightweight Low cost Excellent properties at low temperatures Corrosion resistance depending on fiber Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC’s) High temperature resistance Corrosion resistant Carbon-Carbon Composites Withstand temperatures higher than 3000 C ̊ High specific strength Good resistance to thermal shock Good resistance to wear Calculate the density of a composite using the rule of mixtures for a two- component system (Problem) ρ c =V f ρ f +V m ρ m ρ c =composite density V f =Fiber volume fraction ρ f =fiber density V m =Matrix volume fraction ρ m =Matrix density V f + V m =1
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Assuming zero porosity Calculate the Young’s modulus of a composite (isostrain and
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2008 for the course CHE 253 taught by Professor Carrion during the Fall '08 term at University of Louisville.

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Material Science Test 3 Study Guide - Material Science Test...

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