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ATOC 1050 chapter 8 notes

ATOC 1050 chapter 8 notes - Chapter 8 Air Masses and Fronts...

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Chapter 8 – Air Masses and Fronts I. Air Masses A. An air mass is a large body of air with relatively uniform thermal and moisture characteristics. B. Air masses form over expansive terrains/ bodies of water that are relatively uniformly flat, have similar temperature and humidity characteristics, and light winds. These areas are called “source regions 1. Air has to “sit” over these areas so that the air acquires the temperature and moisture characteristics of the area. 2. Light winds are required so the air mass isn’t blown apart 1
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3. The area must be relatively flat so that the temperature characteristics are more uniform. C. Two major types of source regions: 1. Oceans 2. Continents (large deserts, polar/high plateau regions) Diagram not in text; similar one pg. 138. 2
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D. Naming air masses (NOT IN TEXT!!): 3. “c” = continental = dry 4. “m” = maritime = moist 5. “P” = Polar = cool/cold 6. “T” = Tropical = warm/hot 7. “A” = Arctic = cold 8. “E” = Equatorial = hot Combine these letters to get the air masses and their temperature and moisture characteristics: 1. cP = dry and cool 2. mP = moist and cool 3. cT = dry and warm/hot 4. mT = moist and warm/hot 5. cA = dry and cold 6. mE = moist and hot Know these!! The USA never gets mE air masses and true cA air masses are rare.
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