Final paper Philo - Plato The Republic Categories of...

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Plato, The Republic Categories of Goodness During the course of my reading, Glaucon and Socrates’s dialogue of the Second Book of The Republic caught my attention the most. Glaucon describes what the good is and states that leading an immoral life brings more happiness than leading a moral one, while Socrates confesses he cannot give a definition but proposes a surrogate. What is morally good? What we consider to be morally good? How do we get rewarded? These questions had me reasoning on a just and unjust life and how could I determine the difference between them based upon my actions. I. Form of the Good: The three categories of goodness: -a good we desire only for itself -a good we desire for both itself and its consequences -a good we desire only for its consequences Researching other philosophers on the subject of morality helped me arrive to my analysis of the categories of goodness and formulate my conclusion. II. Kant’s Theory of the Good Will His three propositions: -to have moral worth an action must be done from duty -an action done from duty derives its moral worth from the maxim and not the consequences of it -duty is the necessity of acting from respect for the law III. Mill’s Utilitarianism His theory of morality: -utility is the foundation of morals and action that lead to happiness IV. My Analysis After reading and comparing all three theories, I believe that there are grey areas when it comes to morality and how some are vague, but arrived to a conclusion that Kant’s theory is the most solid on what can be considered moral or immoral and where or how to categorize our actions. V. References: Plato, H. D. P. Lee, and M. S. Lane. The Republic. London: Penguin, 2007. 40-45. Print. Mill, John Stuart. "Chapter 4." Utilitarianism. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 67-73. Print Kant, Immanuel. "Kant's Moral Theory." Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 84-93. Print. CATEGORIES OF GOODNESS
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As we go through the Book II of Plato's Republic, we are acquainted with Glaucon, a philosopher worried with the estimation of justice. He has become adhered attempting to choose if there's any quality in essentially being a just individual; when all he runs over are the results of being just, he discovers no motivation to keep a man from being unjust on the off chance that they can escape with it. Glaucon in this manner challenges Socrates to demonstrate the goodness of being just after he persuasively contends his two primary focuses against it.
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