Sensory Physiology III

Sensory Physiology III - Sensory Physiology III Hearing and...

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Sensory Physiology III Hearing and equilibrium depends on hair cells – compress and decompress air molecules Waves have amplitude (loudness) and frequency (pitch) – detecting device in ear detects this Outer Ear has tympanic membrane middle ear has 3 bones connected to entry point in chochlea hair cells detect sound and equilibrium Eustachian tube connects middle ear to throat – controlled by tensor tympani muscles open tube during swallowing/yawning Middle ear bones detect sound vibrations o Bones can dampen vibration by stiffening muscles during prolonged extremely loud sound Gunshot is too quick for muscles to respond – can damage ear Sound transmission Sound waves strike tympanic membrane and become vibrations energy transferred to bones of middle ear which vibrate stapes attached to membrane of oval window and oval window vibrates creates fluid waves w/in cochlea makes hair cells bend and release NT creates AP that travels thru cochlear
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This note was uploaded on 05/01/2008 for the course BIOL 34 taught by Professor Velez during the Spring '07 term at Dartmouth.

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Sensory Physiology III - Sensory Physiology III Hearing and...

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