Experiment 21 - The Halides

Experiment 21 - The Halides - Iodide Post-Laboratory...

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EXPERIMENT 21 - THE HALIDES REPORT SHEET NAME DATE 1/28/08 LAB DAY None TIME None Unknown # 760 RESULTS TEST I – Test for Fluoride Fluoride Chloride Bromide Iodide Unknown Cloudy White Clear Clear Clear Clear Halide Present in Unknown Cannot be Determined
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TEST II – Test for Chloride Step # 1 – Addition of Ag + Fluoride Chloride Bromide Iodide Unknown Clear White ppt. Light Grey ppt. Yellow ppt. Yellow ppt. Step #2 – Addition of NH 3 Fluoride Chloride Bromide Iodide Unknown --- White ppt. Light Grey ppt. Yellow ppt. Yellow ppt. Step #3 – After centrifuge + addition of HNO 3 Fluoride Chloride Bromide Iodide Unknown --- White Cloudy Clear Clear White Cloudy Halide Present in Unknown Chloride Bromide Iodide Unknown Yellow Hot Pink After 1 drop of Cl 2 After 1 drop of Cl 2 Pale pink surface/bottom. light orange mid layer Pink surface/bottom Orange Middle After 2 drops of Cl 2 After 20 drops of Cl 2 Orange Surface/Bottom Yellow Middle Pink surface + Bottom Orange Middle Halide(s) Present in Unknown
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Unformatted text preview: Iodide Post-Laboratory Questions 1. Ammonia is added to the precipitate in Test II Step #2. Since ammonia is a base and NaOH is a base, can NaOH be substituted for the NH 3 solution? Why? Explain briefly. NaOH might be a base but it can't be subsituted for NH3 solution because NH4+ is always soluble so any compound it forms is soluble. But if NaOH was used, the OH- ions that dissociate will form with the Ag+ ions and form an insoluble precipitate. NaOH would not be a suitable precipitate. 2. Why are the halogens powerful oxidizing agents? Define what an oxidizing agent is. An oxidizing agent is a chemical compound or element that easily gains electrons. Halogens are powerful oxidizing agents because they have 7 valence electrons. Therefore, they only need to gain one electron to achieve greater stability. This is according to the octet rule....
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2008 for the course CHE 1121L taught by Professor Ishwar during the Spring '08 term at St. Johns Duplicate.

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Experiment 21 - The Halides - Iodide Post-Laboratory...

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