Analysis of NFoF - Alycia Essig WTNG 102.35 28 November 2006 Analysis of A Nation's Fear of Flying Anna Quindlen in her essay A Nation's Fear of

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Alycia Essig WTNG 102.35 28 November 2006 Analysis of A Nation’s Fear of Flying Anna Quindlen, in her essay A Nation’s Fear of Flying, asserts that since the terror attacks of 9/11 “the great shock to the American system is realizing that no fortress is inviolate, no wall tall enough and no place really safe” (100). Quindlen supports this idea by presenting examples like, “Our children’s schools now send home instructions for cataclysm-families that will shelter students, ways that parents can be in touch” (l00) and using personal experiences such as feeling uncomfortable seeing the twin towers in a movie, calling them “ghosts on celluloid” (100). Her purpose is to make Americans realize they are not safe from terror attacks in order to help them be more prepared and informed. Quindlen presents her argument to the readers of Newsweek , who are generally the younger adults of America. Her argument is convincing because she uses emotional evidence, including personal experience, to support her claim. Quindlen uses timely and relevant emotional evidence to support her position that
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2008 for the course ENGLISH 104 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '06 term at Roger Williams.

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Analysis of NFoF - Alycia Essig WTNG 102.35 28 November 2006 Analysis of A Nation's Fear of Flying Anna Quindlen in her essay A Nation's Fear of

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