PSC 2302 - F07 - PPT Slides

PSC 2302 - F07 - PPT Slides - American Constitutional...

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American Constitutional  Development Mr. Brogdon
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Revolutionary America • Declaration of Independence (1776) – To what standard does the Declaration appeal? – Why is government necessary? – To what ends are governments instituted? • The Articles of Confederation (c. 1781) – Federalism under the Articles – Deficiencies of the Confederation – Shays Rebellion
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Framing the Constitution The Annapolis Convention (1786) The Philadelphia Convention (1787) Constitution of the Proceedings Dealing with Representation Virginia Plan 5/29 The Compromise Proposed 6/11 New Jersey Plan 6/15 Hamilton Plan and Bedford’s Threat Compromise in mid-July Constructing the Institutions of Government Thinking institutionally Creation of the republican chief executive The new federal judiciary Principle Delegates Ratification and State Sovereignty
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The Ratification Debates Essential Elements of a Good Constitution Popular legitimacy Security of rights Effective government The Anti-Federalists  The small republic argument Prerequisites for ordered liberty The Constitution’s bad tendencies No alternatives to the Articles of Confederation The Federalist Papers Federalist 10: The extensive republic  Implicit criticism of state governments Controlling the effects of faction A positive alternative to the Articles
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Marbury v. Madison (1803) • Chief Justice John Marshall – Midnight appointments – Three questions – The argument for judicial review • The Constitution as fundamental law • The judicial function
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• “[The judiciary] may truly be said to have  neither Force nor Will, but merely judgment.”  • What is “mere judgment”? • Why is authoritative interpretation necessary? • Why should the Court be the authoritative  interpreter of the Constitution? – The short answer
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2008 for the course PSC 2302 taught by Professor Dr.riley during the Fall '08 term at Baylor.

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PSC 2302 - F07 - PPT Slides - American Constitutional...

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