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Honor and Love

Honor and Love - Dennis Zuo Shakespeare Ms.Neusen Honor the...

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Dennis Zuo Shakespeare Ms.Neusen October 22, 2006 Honor, the Insatiable Mistress of Mankind Moment before the hazardous voyage across the unassailable Alps, Napoleon, the young brilliant general, once said to his soldiers “Brothers, what we men do in life echoes in eternity.” With this kind of adamant belief he left his beloved wife, Josephine, only on the dawn after his wedding night. By choice he rejected humanity, but in return he transcended himself to a great man who lived for principles and honor, much like Hotspur in Shakespeare’s Henry IV . It is the desire for honor that distinguishes a person’s worthiness along with his character. Yet without this desire virtues would exist no more, nor would the best content of humanity, love. If the ability to love others requires the ability to love oneself in the first place, then the desire for honor would determine how much love a person can commit to the world, as shown in Richard Lovelace’s words “I could not love thee, dear, so much / Loved I not honor more”. Constantly whispering the sweet sense of vanity into one’s ear,
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Honor and Love - Dennis Zuo Shakespeare Ms.Neusen Honor the...

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